The Oldest Foods on Earth: A History of Australian Native Foods with Recipes

The Oldest Foods on Earth A History of Australian Native Foods with Recipes This is a book about Australian food the unique flora and fauna that nourished the Aboriginal peoples of this land for over years It is because European Australians have hardly ever touched th

  • Title: The Oldest Foods on Earth: A History of Australian Native Foods with Recipes
  • Author: JohnNewton
  • ISBN: 9781742234373
  • Page: 236
  • Format: Paperback
  • This is a book about Australian food, the unique flora and fauna that nourished the Aboriginal peoples of this land for over 50 000 years It is because European Australians have hardly ever touched these foods for over 200 years that I am writing this book We celebrate cultural and culinary diversity, yet shun the foods that grew here before white settlers arrived We This is a book about Australian food, the unique flora and fauna that nourished the Aboriginal peoples of this land for over 50 000 years It is because European Australians have hardly ever touched these foods for over 200 years that I am writing this book We celebrate cultural and culinary diversity, yet shun the foods that grew here before white settlers arrived We love superfoods from remote, exotic locations, yet reject those that grow in our own land In this, the most important of his books, John Newton boils down these paradoxes by arguing that if we are what you eat, we need to eat different foods, foods that will attune us to the this land.

    One thought on “The Oldest Foods on Earth: A History of Australian Native Foods with Recipes”

    1. I have a strong interest in Australian native plants and already knew a fair bit about native foods before this book.This is a very breezy and easy to read, conversational style book about an important topic. 5 stars for raising it, but 3 stars for what it says. The discussion about why we don't use native foods more, and also the debate about whether they are "Aboriginal" foods or just food from Australian plants was thought provoking. The future is less clear. Of course we should be using more [...]

    2. Although a little repetitive, this is a great book and an easy read for those keen on expanding their knowledge and use of native ingredients.There is much discussion as to why Australian foods have taken so long to get on to our plates and into our kitchen gardens - much of it put down to racism and cultural cringe. It is certainly something of a conundrum, given the longstanding popularity of drought-resistant native plants in our gardensNewton takes a good look at some of the history of nativ [...]

    3. Interesting perspective on why we've been so slow to take up native Australian foods - possibly food racism as Newton claims, certainly cultural cringe. The popularity of macadamias only after we imported them from Hawaii (although once we acquired a taste for them we accepted homegrown) is a good case in point.Kuranga Native Nursery in outer Melbourne seems to be quite successful - selling native plants and serving native-inspired food in its Paperbark Cafe. We've bought native food plants from [...]

    4. A useful text for anyone who has access to and an interest in utilising native foods of Australia.Just one big tip: Don't miss out on sampling finger limes if you get the chance. They're an awesome citrus burst!

    5. Fascinating and compellingI rarely read non-fiction but I'm becoming increasingly aware of horrifying gaps or outright historical falsehoods in my own knowledge of Australia. This book was fast-paced, lingering only on some delicious recipes which I'm dying to try out.

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