The Psychedelic Gospels: The Secret History of Hallucinogens in Christianity

The Psychedelic Gospels The Secret History of Hallucinogens in Christianity Reveals evidence of visionary plants in Christianity and the life of Jesus found in medieval art and biblical scripture hidden in plain sight for centuries Follows the authors anthropological adventur

  • Title: The Psychedelic Gospels: The Secret History of Hallucinogens in Christianity
  • Author: Jerry B. Brown Julie M. Brown
  • ISBN: 9781620555026
  • Page: 283
  • Format: Paperback
  • Reveals evidence of visionary plants in Christianity and the life of Jesus found in medieval art and biblical scripture hidden in plain sight for centuries Follows the authors anthropological adventure discovering sacred mushroom images in European and Middle Eastern churches, including Roslyn Chapel and Chartres Provides color photos showing how R Gordon Wasson s psyReveals evidence of visionary plants in Christianity and the life of Jesus found in medieval art and biblical scripture hidden in plain sight for centuries Follows the authors anthropological adventure discovering sacred mushroom images in European and Middle Eastern churches, including Roslyn Chapel and Chartres Provides color photos showing how R Gordon Wasson s psychedelic theory of religion clearly extends to Christianity and reveals why Wasson suppressed this information due to his secret relationship with the Vatican Examines the Bible and the Gnostic Gospels to show that visionary plants were the catalyst for Jesus s awakening to his divinity and immortalityThroughout medieval Christianity, religious works of art emerged to illustrate the teachings of the Bible for the largely illiterate population What, then, is the significance of the psychoactive mushrooms hiding in plain sight in the artwork and icons of many European and Middle Eastern churches Does Christianity have a psychedelic history Providing stunning visual evidence from their anthropological journey throughout Europe and the Middle East, including visits to Roslyn Chapel and Chartres Cathedral, authors Julie and Jerry Brown document the role of visionary plants in Christianity They retrace the pioneering research of R Gordon Wasson, the famous sacred mushroom seeker, on psychedelics in ancient Greece and India, and among the present day reindeer herders of Siberia and the Mazatecs of Mexico Challenging Wasson s legacy, the authors reveal his secret relationship with the Vatican that led to Wasson s refusal to pursue his hallucinogen theory into the hallowed halls of Christianity.Examining the Bible and the Gnostic Gospels, the authors provide scriptural support to show that sacred mushrooms were the inspiration for Jesus revelation of the Kingdom of Heaven and that he was initiated into these mystical practices in Egypt during the Missing Years They contend that the Trees of Knowledge and of Immortality in Eden were sacred mushrooms.Uncovering the role played by visionary plants in the origins of Judeo Christianity, the authors invite us to rethink what we know about the life of Jesus and to consider a controversial theory that challenges us to explore these sacred pathways to the divine.

    One thought on “The Psychedelic Gospels: The Secret History of Hallucinogens in Christianity”

    1. This book is the epitome of buy the ticket, take the ride. Look. You are reading a book looking for proof of psychedelics in early Christianity. You have to just take some things for granted. Suspend your disbelief. Because these are the kind of slightly spacey, very kooky people who say things like “It was through entheogens that we [the authors] first came to experience God as the divine intelligence that permeates the universe.”“Our findings do not deny the importance of religious sacra [...]

    2. Psychadelic GospelsA raging argument in the the religious scholar community is the debate about the role of ehtneogens or psychadelic drugs on the development of Christianity and other religions. Most religious leaders will try to deny the role of psychodelics in the religions development while someone more open minded might say there is quite a bit of eveidence pointing to the use of hallicinogens.Starting off with the research of R.Gordon Wasson the author Doctor Jerry Brown and his wife Julii [...]

    3. This bookwants to be good. I'm just simply not convinced. Actually, here is what the book convinced me of: A few medieval painters were interested in stylizing trees of life and last-supper imagery into amanita muscaria mushrooms. Beyond that, It wasn't very educative, informative, or thought-provoking. I was especially disappointed, because I began reading the book already believing the author's conclusions, but wanting to be blown away by actual evidence. Or maybe even some speculation on what [...]

    4. Very interesting book about the connection between psychedelics and religion. The book contains various beautiful pieces of art found in churches. There is certainly a link between psychedelics and religion that has to be studied more intensively. There is a review about John Allegro's claims made in "The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross" which is also interesting if you've read that book. Overall, I'm happy I bought the book and I can recommend it to everyone that is interested in religion, drugs [...]

    5. It's a very interesting book. The author is very passionate about the subject and has done a lot of great research along with wonderful visuals to support it. It's a subject I've honestly never considered before, so it gave me a lot to think about and there is definitely evidence of mushrooms in the artwork. I'm not sure that I am fully convinced that psychedelic mushrooms are the root cause of the miracles performed by Jesus, but that's more of a personal opinion and belief. It's a very well wr [...]

    6. Not fully convincing, but didn't expect it to be. There are definitely mushrooms in some of the art, but there is never any evidence that comes close to causal. That said, very enjoyable read. Be warned that there is almost a plot following the relationship of the husband and wife, but I enjoyed this aspect and it actually makes me more likely to pick this up again compared to similar books.

    7. A very interesting book that analyzes the tremendous number of religious paintings containing psychoactive plants and mushrooms in the early Christian period of 300-1300 AD. The author suggests the admittedly unproveable idea that early clergy used psychoactive substances to receive spiritual insights.

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