The Art of Star Wars: Episode VI—Return of the Jedi

The Art of Star Wars Episode VI Return of the Jedi The ART OF STAR WARS RETURN OF THE JEDI is a lavish full color volume that commemorates the creative genius and technical wizardry behind RETURN OF THE JEDI the dazzling space epic Illustrating the

  • Title: The Art of Star Wars: Episode VI—Return of the Jedi
  • Author: Carol Titelman George Lucas
  • ISBN: 9780345410894
  • Page: 473
  • Format: Paperback
  • The ART OF STAR WARS RETURN OF THE JEDI is a lavish, full color volume that commemorates the creative genius and technical wizardry behind RETURN OF THE JEDI, the dazzling space epic Illustrating the original screenplay are hundreds of sketches, storyboards, matte paintings, blueprints, production paintings, and costume designs the work of the conceptual artists and dThe ART OF STAR WARS RETURN OF THE JEDI is a lavish, full color volume that commemorates the creative genius and technical wizardry behind RETURN OF THE JEDI, the dazzling space epic Illustrating the original screenplay are hundreds of sketches, storyboards, matte paintings, blueprints, production paintings, and costume designs the work of the conceptual artists and designers whose skill and imagination gave rise to the wonders seen on the screen by the whole world.

    One thought on “The Art of Star Wars: Episode VI—Return of the Jedi”

    1. The Art of Return of the Jedi was originally published in 1983 and includes the complete script of the film by Lawrence Kasdan and George Lucas. The film runs at 2 hours and 13 minutes. In regards to this script format, CAPITAL LETTERS are designated for direction, scene locations, and characters. Speaking characters are also in bold.Italics are used to set the scene, describe actions, dialogue’s (tone) and (who is being addressed), and language. Some of the demoed STORYBOARDS have description [...]

    2. I recently read The Art of Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back, and this subsequent book in the series deserves a similar review to my review of that volume. The art is, again, spectacular - perhaps even more so as the new locations and aliens of Return of the Jedi are in many ways more spectacular than the harsh imperial settings of The Empire Strikes Back. But then again, is anything more wonderful than Cloud City? As with the previous volume, some of the art is not well presented, [...]

    3. The full screenplay for the third film, accompanied by stills, production designs and paintings. Reading this directly after the Empire Strikes Back one (last book read in 2012) was a mistake - where that volume concentrated on the images, showing designs building up to finished models/sets/etc with explanatory text, this has the screenplay (not the strongest of the original trilogy, in my opinion) and the artwork is cut back accordingly. Worse, we end up with lots of costume designs (each entry [...]

    4. And finally the end of the saga or so we thought - this was like the other two art of star wars books originally published shortly after the films release and was seen as many as the end of the saga even though at the time it was stated these where the middle three of a 9 film series. Well we know now what that became - but back then to a small boy allowed to peer over my brothers shoulder this (and the other two books) fired my imagination possibly more than the original film - now years later [...]

    5. As I finished reading the last of this series (or at least of the ones I own) I couldn't help but feel there is lost potential here. While the art is as beautiful and as interesting as ever. Return of the Jedi returned (sorry for the repetition) to A New Hope's format of just movie script and no behind the scenes information. This made it a quicker and less interesting read. Of the three movies, Return of the Jedi has a lot of interesting special effects and it would have been so great to learn [...]

    6. I have a battered old copy of this book on my shelf and it never gets old. It shows a great deal of the concept art for Return of the Jedi, alongside the film's script. Featuring preliminary and unfamiliar designs of familiar characters, environment concepts, and much more, it's a wonderful addition to the library of any Star Wars fan.

    7. A return to the script-focused format of A New Hope.Still a vast improvement over Hope though, if only for the more interesting concept art, character designs, and matte paintings.I just wish that Deborah Call had edited all three of these.

    8. Though Empire was the best film, its the concept art for Jedi that really makes this the best of the late 90s art books.

    9. At the time, we thought this was it for the "canon" Star Wars universe. I was a tad disappointed, but I think only because it was an "ending".

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