Letters from England

Letters from England Karel Capek s Letters from England have established themselves as masterpieces of observation The letters and drawings are humorous insightful and imbued by a profound humanity They convey a bemused

  • Title: Letters from England
  • Author: Karel Čapek Paul Selver
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 311
  • Format: Paperback
  • Karel Capek s Letters from England have established themselves as masterpieces of observation The letters and drawings are humorous, insightful and imbued by a profound humanity They convey a bemused admiration for England and the English First published in the nineteen twenties in Lidovc Noviny, the Czechoslovak national newspaper, Capek s Letters from England quicklKarel Capek s Letters from England have established themselves as masterpieces of observation The letters and drawings are humorous, insightful and imbued by a profound humanity They convey a bemused admiration for England and the English First published in the nineteen twenties in Lidovc Noviny, the Czechoslovak national newspaper, Capek s Letters from England quickly established themselves as masterpieces of observation, and classics of modern Czech prose The letters described Europe s oldest democracy for the benefit of the citizens of Europe s newest, and Capek was acutely aware of the deep down affinity between his countrymen and the English The same understated humour, the same unflappability, the same quiet search for peace, home and comfort, the same love of nature and animals, served to unite the two people, both then and now Shortly after Letters from England appeared, Czechoslovakia was betrayed by Britain at Munich, and handed over to Hitler.

    One thought on “Letters from England”

    1. An extremely charming travel book by the excellent Czech writer. Capek writes about the eccentricities of British life in the 1920s. He deplores British food, disparages the rain and the traffic and criticises the insularity; but he praises the countryside and some of the quaint traditions Capek was a very humourous writer but also a very humane one. He always supports the underdog. He also has some genuinely profound things to say on nature, aesthetics and imperialism. His sketches are superb a [...]

    2. I was charmed by this book; but is it enough to simply say I was charmed? Should I not try to explain why I was charmed? Ok. You asked for it.First Impression: A wise man once said nothing.Early in the book, Capek accidentally (so he says) wonders into Hyde Park on a Sunday and witnesses the spectacle of soapbox orators and debaters. Although to a man like Capek this must have seemed like a heavenly vision of equality and freedom, he does not wax rhapsodic, choosing instead to draw only a simple [...]

    3. Charmingly satirical anecdotes/observations re: the English, English institutions etc. 'The man sitting opposite you in the train will anger you for two hours by not regarding you as worthy of a glance; suddenly he gets up and hands you your bag which you are unable to reach. Here the people always manage to help each other, but they never have anything to say to each other, except about the weather. [] It is perhaps through sheer taciturnity that the English swallow half of every word and then [...]

    4. A joyful read with some timeless observations from the great Czech writer. Predates many other tours of England, most famously J B Priestley, but contrary to its title also covers Scotland (at his most poetic), Wales and very dismissively (but mostly due to recommendation of his English friends) Ireland. In fact the latter provides an interesting commentary on the 'Irish Question' as seen from the 1920s. There are many comments on the English that seem, 90 years on, no less relevant. Worth findi [...]

    5. Ágil y preñado de humor, y con el toque entrañable de Capek. Me fascina (me fascina y me da mucha envidia, claro) cómo es capaz de escribir sobre la esencia profunda de Inglaterra y Escocia y hacer reír al mismo tiempo.

    6. Čapek has an astute eye leading to elegant epistles from 1930s England: a kind of travelogue about habits. As a recent immigrant, I loved it.

    7. Část o gentlemenech byla naprosto úžasná. Cituji:"Gentleman, to je odměřená sloučenina mlčení, ochoty, důstojnosti, sportu, novin a počestnosti. Dvě hodiny vás dožírá váš protějšek ve vlaku tím, že vás neuzná za hodna pohledu; najednou vstane a podá vám váš kufřík, na který jaksi nemůžete dosáhnout."

    8. he's one of the biggest writer of 20th centuryhis talent of describing the whole life in England is breath taking

    9. Karel Čapek. Estampas checasNo se puede decir que Karel Čapek perdiera mucho el tiempo. Hizo de todo y lo hizo bien, y eso seguramente le valió ser no solo uno de los escritores checos más conocidos (y reconocibles) sino también todo un personaje. Su obra se ha ido publicando en España (o mejor, en nuestro idioma) desde hace mucho, y ello nos ha permitido tener un amplio abanico de ediciones de todos los tamaños y formas. Pero entre todo ello, si algo había quedado un poco ahí, en el ol [...]

    10. Stromy jsou snad to nejkrásnější v Anglii. Také ovšem louky a strážnici, ale hlavně stromy, krásně plecité, staré, rozložité, volné, ctihodné a převeliké stromy.Londýnská ulice je jen takové koryto, kterým život teče, aby už byl doma. Na ulicích se nežije, nekouká, nemluví, nestojí ani nesedí; ulicemi se jenom probíhá.Říkám Vám, je to strašné; strašný je relativismus času a prostoru, ale strašnější je relativismus kultury a dějin; nikde za námi an [...]

    11. I first read this in 2006, then decided to re-read for our trip to England. Anything by Čapek is worth reading, but this was also relevant. Čapek really did not care for England or the English--but he made a nice characterization out of it. I read several passages aloud for Kathy and we laughed over them. Despite the fact that these were written over 90 years ago, they still ring true. One point he makes is that while we might think of the English (especially in the time of the Empire) as glob [...]

    12. For the drawings and the policemen, not the views on women's voices and the purple prose (which has dated awfully)

    13. In many points very, very outdated travelogue. But interesting insight to both Czech and English mentality between the world wars. Some of it interestingly still persist :)

    14. I found this book in a second hand bookshop in Canterbury this summer.It's a really lovely little travel book, amusing and interesting.

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