Comic Book Culture: Fanboys and True Believers

Comic Book Culture Fanboys and True Believers What are super devoted fans of comic books really like What draws them together and energizes their zeal What do the denizens of this pop culture world have in common This book provides good answers a

  • Title: Comic Book Culture: Fanboys and True Believers
  • Author: Matthew J. Pustz
  • ISBN: 9781578062010
  • Page: 239
  • Format: Paperback
  • What are super devoted fans of comic books really like What draws them together and energizes their zeal What do the denizens of this pop culture world have in common This book provides good answers as it scrutinizes the fans whose profiles can be traced at their conventions, in pages of fanzines, on websites, in chat rooms, on electronic bulletin boards, and before theWhat are super devoted fans of comic books really like What draws them together and energizes their zeal What do the denizens of this pop culture world have in common This book provides good answers as it scrutinizes the fans whose profiles can be traced at their conventions, in pages of fanzines, on websites, in chat rooms, on electronic bulletin boards, and before the racks in comic book stores They are a singular breed, and an absorbing interest in comic books sometimes life consuming unites them.Studies have shows that the clustering, die hard disciples of Star Trek have produced a unique culture The same can be said of American enthusiasts of comic books These aficionados range from the stereotypical fanboy who revels in the minute details of mainstream superhero titles like X Men to the discriminating and downright snobbish reader of idiosyncratic alternative comics like Eightball Literate comics like Watchman, Radioactive Man, and Peepshow demand a knowledgeable audience and reward members of the culture for their expertise while tending to alienate those outside This book shows how the degree of comics literacy determines a fan s place in the culture and how the most sophisticated share the nuanced history of the format.Although their interaction is filled with conflicts, all groups share an intense love for the medium But whether one is a Fanboy or a True Believer, the preferred hangout is the specialty store Here, as they talk shop, the culture proliferates They debate among themselves, spread news about the industry, arrange trades, discuss collectibles, and attach themselves to their particular mainstream.With history, interviews, and textual analysis Comic Book Culture Fanboys and True Believers examines the varied reading communities absorbed by the veneration of the comics and demonstrates how each functions in the ever broadening culture.

    One thought on “Comic Book Culture: Fanboys and True Believers”

    1. While it succesfully synthesized a plethora of academic sources at a time when comics studies were not really on anyone's radar, Pustz's book has not aged well. I found its use of value-laden language ("snobism," "fanboy") particularly irritating. The author expects too little from his audience, belaboring some points as though the readers cannot be trusted to apply previously-introduced theories to new material. Still, "Comic Book Culture" is a revealing snapshot of a market before its product [...]

    2. As you may guess from the title, this is an academic look at the culture of comic book fandom. As such, it's a touch on the dry side in places. But Pustz has a genuine affection and enthusiasm for his subject matter, which helps carry it through the rough spots. One of the reasons I wanted to read this book was that I was hoping for some sort of history of comics fandom. It's a topic I've been curious about. There's some history in this book, but it's more of a cultural study than anything. Than [...]

    3. I'm using this book in my college writing course ("text+vision") this semester, and it is exactly what I wanted from a cultural overview of comic book fandom. Pustz does a great job of explaining how fandom came about, how it compares to other cultures (with a consistent reference to baseball fans, for example), and some of its peculiarities. In particular, he is able to partly explain the incestual nature of consumer and producers in comics, where each is a responsible party to the worst excess [...]

    4. This was an interesting book (and not what I had expected). Pustz talks about comic book fandom, and while I think he over-reaches when he mentions that comic book fandom could be a model for other American fan communities, he brings to light how fans of comic books are constructed by the materials they read and how this, in turn, creates the fan community (or communities). I thought he made some really good points about how comic book fans are active participants in their reading practices, and [...]

    5. The University of Mississippi Press published this nice little dissertation examining the world of comic book fans in all their varieties, ranging all the way from superhero fanboys ("E") to alt comics snobs (like me). The author argues that despite all the rather annoying nerdball behavior that often runs rampant throughout this specialized and rather isolated community, comic book fans can and do actively engage in and help create and evolve their culture rather than just passively consuming i [...]

    6. Very straight forward and clearly written. It gets a bit repetitive at times as fan culture tends to do - perhaps in an attempt to be thorough.

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