Vertoscope: A Villainous Collection by Many Devious Minds

Vertoscope A Villainous Collection by Many Devious Minds VERTOSCOPE is an original comics anthology that specializes in beasts villains shadows and anything else you might find by taking the wrong way home The theme of the book is antagonist as protagoni

  • Title: Vertoscope: A Villainous Collection by Many Devious Minds
  • Author: Nechama Frier Ten Van Winkle Mady G Enoch Grace Park Ursula Wood Jenn Doyle One of Two
  • ISBN: 9780692624210
  • Page: 254
  • Format: Paperback
  • VERTOSCOPE is an original comics anthology that specializes in beasts, villains, shadows, and anything else you might find by taking the wrong way home The theme of the book is antagonist as protagonist to look at things from the other side

    One thought on “Vertoscope: A Villainous Collection by Many Devious Minds”

    1. Nechama Frier is a friend, and I've met Ten Van Winkle, but I also really, really adored the idea behind this anthology: stories from a villain's perspective. The authors that contributed are very diverse and talented.Glaskönigin by Ten Van Winkle: I aboslutely adored this little story. It set the tone for the anthology brilliantly. Her comments in the Process Work made it all the better.The Devil's Dentist by Mady G: Teeth horror always gets me. The art style for this was cute (or as cute as i [...]

    2. This was a really good anthology. It's a collection of stories about villains, told from their perspectives. Most of them are really sympathetic. A few are truly evil. One is about goddamn wasps and that story should be burned with the same fire used to burn wasps. But the rest were great! As an anthology, there's a wide range of writing and art styles, which means that not all the stories will work for all readers, though I enjoyed them all. Most readers should be able to find plenty to enjoy h [...]

    3. Most of the comics in this anthology have a definite "amateur" feel to them, with uneven art, layouts, writing, and pacing. That being said, there are a few standout stories that feature interesting interpretations of the theme of "villainy" and read smoothly as sequential art. My favorite piece was "Witchweed," which is essentially Sailor Moon as seen from Queen Beryl's perspective. I also enjoyed "Bear My Teeth," in which a downtrodden office worker turns into a literal bear and devours her bo [...]

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