Cognitive Neuroscience: A Very Short Introduction

Cognitive Neuroscience A Very Short Introduction Up to the s psychology was deeply under the influence of behaviourism which focused on stimuli and responses and regarded consideration of what may happen in the mind as unapproachable scientif

  • Title: Cognitive Neuroscience: A Very Short Introduction
  • Author: Richard Passingham
  • ISBN: 9780198786221
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Paperback
  • Up to the 1960s, psychology was deeply under the influence of behaviourism, which focused on stimuli and responses, and regarded consideration of what may happen in the mind as unapproachable scientifically This began to change with the devising of methods to try to tap into what was going on in the black box of the mind, and the development of cognitive psychology WUp to the 1960s, psychology was deeply under the influence of behaviourism, which focused on stimuli and responses, and regarded consideration of what may happen in the mind as unapproachable scientifically This began to change with the devising of methods to try to tap into what was going on in the black box of the mind, and the development of cognitive psychology With the study of patients who had suffered brain damage or injury to limited parts of the brain, outlines of brain components and processes began to take shape, and by the end of the 1970s, a new science, cognitive neuroscience, was born But it was with the development of ways of accessing activation of the working brain using imaging techniques such as PET and fMRI that cognitive neuroscience came into its own, as a science cutting across psychology and neuroscience, with strong connections to philosophy of mind Experiments involving subjects in scanners while doing various tasks, thinking, problem solving, and remembering are shedding light on the brain processes involved The research is exciting and new, and often makes media headlines But there is much misunderstanding about what brain imaging tells us, and the interpretation of studies on cognition In this Very Short Introduction Richard Passingham, a distinguished cognitive neuroscientist, gives a provocative and exciting account of the nature and scope of this relatively new field, and the techniques available to us, focusing on investigation of the human brain He explains what brain imaging shows, pointing out common misconceptions, and gives a brief overview of the different aspects of human cognition perceiving, attending, remembering, reasoning, deciding, and acting Passingham concludes with a discussion of the exciting advances that may lie ahead ABOUT THE SERIES The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area These pocket sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

    One thought on “Cognitive Neuroscience: A Very Short Introduction”

    1. The technical nature of this book can make it hard to follow entirely at times, but it remains accessible and interesting, and so a good first contact with neuroscience.

    2. I really liked the structure of this book. Each chapter starts with layman level questions about human behavioural traits, and then addresses them in terms of empirical findings about brain structure and connectivity. It's one the best popular science books I've read about brain function and really bangs the last nails into the coffin of mind/body duality.There was a particularly good explanation of the structural aspects behind the Fast and Slow Thinking behaviour identified by Daniel Kahnemann [...]

    3. This book was amazing, it really was a short introduction but very easy to read for a first year neuroscience student, although some people may find having a dictionary of some form nearby useful. The layout is very handy posing questions then showing evidence before giving an answer at the end of the chapter. An excellent book for anyone interested in how the brain works and not too long.

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