The Worst Years of Your Life: Stories for the Geeked-Out, Angst-Ridden, Lust-Addled, and Deeply Misunderstood Adolescent in All of Us

The Worst Years of Your Life Stories for the Geeked Out Angst Ridden Lust Addled and Deeply Misunderstood Adolescent in All of Us A delightful and terrifying collection of twenty short stories edited by critically acclaimed writer and novelist Mark Jude Poirier Adolescence Fortunately it s over with early and once you ve finish

  • Title: The Worst Years of Your Life: Stories for the Geeked-Out, Angst-Ridden, Lust-Addled, and Deeply Misunderstood Adolescent in All of Us
  • Author: Mark Jude Poirier
  • ISBN: 9781416549260
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Paperback
  • A delightful and terrifying collection of twenty short stories, edited by critically acclaimed writer and novelist Mark Jude Poirier Adolescence Fortunately it s over with early and once you ve finished paying for therapy, there s still a chance to move on with your life The Worst Years of Your Life says it all angst, depression, growing pains, puberty, nasty boys andA delightful and terrifying collection of twenty short stories, edited by critically acclaimed writer and novelist Mark Jude Poirier Adolescence Fortunately it s over with early and once you ve finished paying for therapy, there s still a chance to move on with your life The Worst Years of Your Life says it all angst, depression, growing pains, puberty, nasty boys and nastier girls these are stories of aaawkwardness and embarassment from a stellar list of contributors Great postmodern classics like John Barth s Lost in the Funhouse are paired with newer selections, such as Stacey Richter s The Beauty Treatment and A.M Homes s A Real Doll, in this searing, unforgettable collection A perfect book for revisiting old favorites and discovering new ones, and the opportunity to relive the worst years of your life without having to relive the worst years of your life.

    One thought on “The Worst Years of Your Life: Stories for the Geeked-Out, Angst-Ridden, Lust-Addled, and Deeply Misunderstood Adolescent in All of Us”

    1. This was a mixed bag, like all anthologies. Based on Mark Jude Poirier's excellent coming-of-age novel, "Goats", I was hoping for something out of the ordinary. But the stories in this collection rarely transcend your typical adolescent angst. There are, of course, subtypes:adolescent cruelty/bullying : 5 storiesstartling act of pathological adolescent violence : 2 storiesgeneralized adolescent confusion : 4 storiesadolescent horniness, consummated : 3 storiesadolescent lust, unconsummated : 3 s [...]

    2. If I ever teach a course on Young Adult literature, this will be one of the required texts. In The Worst Years of Your Life, published by Simon & Schuster Paperbacks. Mark Jude Pairier has gathered 20 stories about adolescence. The Worst Years of Your Life is a great read—well, most of it…I think the main problem was: who was the target audience for this collection—adults looking back on their teen years or to write something scandalous for teens to read and feel more adult? Julie Orri [...]

    3. One thing I liked about this anthology was that the editor gets out of the way. After the introduction, there are no summaries, no explanation on why he chose the stories he did - I can simply experience them myself and draw my own conclusions.Most of the stories in this collection capture the awkwardness of the teenage years, so it will most likely come down to a matter of taste and personal experiences on which stories are the "best." My personal favorites:Note to Sixth-Grade Self by Julie Orr [...]

    4. Most of these stories were unpleasant to me, but in a true and unsettling way, and the best, Chris Adrian's "A Child's Book of Sickness and Death" actually shocking. The writing seemed uniformly good: "There was some simple, radical difference about him; he hoped it was genius, feared it was madness, devoted himself to amiability and inconspicuousness." (p. 70) "I was swinging at the time, watching the men from the moving company slide pieces of a fuzzy red water bed out of their truck, when my [...]

    5. I really enjoyed reading these stories, many of which contained the phrase, "in that awkward phase," or "at that awkward age." I'm wondering though, if that age ever really ends. I don't remember ever entering into that phase or exiting from it. I often find myself in situations similar to those in the stories even now. I don't think I ever will find myself outgrowing embarressment or awkward situations. This book contained a story from my favorite author, George Saunders, as well as some other [...]

    6. I was excited to read this book; but was sorely disappointed. Most of the stories focus on bully/bullied relationships in the typical way: for males, an overt hatred; for females, friends who pretend to like you but then stab you in the back.The third category of stories - sexual encounters, characterized by "A Real Doll" etc. - are too bizarre for my taste. The highlight was probably "Lost in the Funhouse" which has a more complex story-in-story leaving you wondering who the narrator is.

    7. This is an interesting collection of short stories all focusing on life as an adolescent. I related to some of the experiences/emotions of a few of the characters, but many of the teens in this collection are pretty screwy--case in point the "A Real Doll" story featuring a talking Barbie. Highlights from the collection include the "A Child's Book of Sickness and Death" and "Thunderbird," and my favorite is "Note to Sixth-Grade Self." Those three selections alone are worth checking out the book.

    8. Very hit or miss anthology where adult writers contribute stories about adolescence. I struggled to get through a few of these, but it's entirely worth it for the best story in the bunch, "A Child's Book of Sickness and Death," which chronicles the pain, frustration, and strangeness of coming of age as a chronically ill child. I did appreciate that there was a decent mix of men and women, from both vantage points, but so many of the stories had little substance other than 'I was bullied.'

    9. Love the concept of this book (stories about the awkward, awful time of adolescences), but some of the stories very loosely were linked to the theme. There are some standouts though including George Saunders's "Bohemians" (which I believe is also in the 2005 nonrequired reading collection), Stacey Richter's "The Beauty Treatment", and Kevin Canty's "Pretty Judy". I also enjoyed the introduction.

    10. This anthology was very hit or miss for me. I loved the beautifully written, bittersweet "Note to Sixth-Grade Self." However many of the other stories were too dark, violent or disturbing for me to want to carry on reading. They were well written, that wasn't my problem with it. Just the content was sometimes too grim for me to want to spend time in that world. I made it about halfway through the book and then decided to bail.

    11. This novel of short stories tells the experiences of 20 author's in middle and high school and how coping with the hardships of adolescence affected them. The book sort of gives puberty and adolescence a negative tone, but the funny, twisty-turny, and witty approach most of the authors write with are what make the stories worth reading. I found that I could relate to most of the things the characters in each of the short stories were dealing with which made the novel even more interesting.

    12. a compilation of short stories written by people you've heard of and hopefully read. the stories are written with a lot of candor and seem to focus on the puberty stories of those not growing up easy breezy. if you struggled as a teenager, were lonely, picked on, had weird experiences that left you out of the 'in' crowd, i defy you to read this book and not relate to at least one of these stories. some of them are sad but most are hilarious.

    13. I seemed unable to read as much as I wanted this summer, but I just finished this one. A collection of short stories about adolescence. Difficult to rate because some stories I enjoyed very much and others I felt rather indifferent about. However, I would recommend it, as I rather enjoyed the majority of the short stories. Most stories are very personal and, at times, uncomfortable to read.

    14. Although this anthology does capture the "geeked-out, angst-ridden, lust-addled" moments of adolescence well, it does so with stories of damaged teens and tweens that often rely on identification with the moment more than coherent plot and, particularly, satisfying endings. Perhaps that, too, is a truth about adolescence, but I expect more in my fiction. A mixed bag.

    15. The short stories included in this book made me feel like someone tapped into my diary for inspiration. The characters and situations made me laugh, cringe and sympathize with. The title definitely wraps up the comical stories that had me (only slightly) resenting that I hadn't thought of it first.

    16. This fantastic book of short stories took me back to both the best and worst of my junior high years. Painfully funny and hilariously sad it revisits the trials and tribulations of the most difficult years of most folks' lives. It's been almost a year since I read it and I can still vividly recall some of the stories.

    17. The Worst Years of Your Life is a great book.There are standout authors, and standout stories but all are good in their own right.Really funny in a painful way. I think all of you ladies would like it.* I mean ladies in the loosest way possible of course*

    18. The compilation is funny at its best, but for the most part something is lacking. It's probably because the stories in the book aren't really the ones I can relate with -- as I live in a very different context and setting.

    19. This book is funny and has something everyone can relate to. However, there are some parts where the magic fades out and gets a little too boring for my taste. Anyone who remembers being a teenager will smile through all of the all-to-familiar embarrassing moments and enjoy themselves.

    20. this could've been so much better! to be fair, some of the stories were quite entertaining, but overall it fell flat as a collection. maybe i just wanted to read more about similar adolescence as mine

    21. We get loads of free books at the office, and when the higher-ups don't want them they tend to trickle down. This one, about the adolescent years, was offered directly to me. I'm not sure if I should be offended or proud.

    22. I had no intention of reading this whole thing, but got sucked in. For the most part enjoyable (some, in the squirmy self-recognition way)tales of adolescence.Great to read right before bedtime. Leads to nightmares of high school.

    23. an excellent reminder of exactly why i never want to be thirteen again, yet profound, poignant, and funny.

    24. This was a lovely connection of short stories about the awkwardness of being a teenager. A few brought serious tears to my eyes, and many made me laugh. I definitely recommend it.

    25. If you love short story compilations, pick this up. Every single story gave me a new author to check out.

    26. A decent collection of coming-of-age stories with a few stand-out stories, particularly Chris Adrian's "A Child's Book of Sickness and Death" and Stanley Elkin's "A Poetics for Bullies."

    27. I found the stories to be out of touch with what I felt as a teen. I love nostalgia and angst, but some of these were TOO out there for my taste.

    28. This is a great compilation of short stories. Admittedly, I had read most of them before - but it was fun to have them all together.

    29. A terrific and varied collection about that peroiod of maturation when we're all likely to sustain some serious psychic damage.

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