The Origin of Birds in the Footprints of Writing

The Origin of Birds in the Footprints of Writing Clarence St Claire is a programmer who cherishes an orderly life His motto work is important people not so much His determination to be The Most Serious Person on the Planet is threatened when he bec

  • Title: The Origin of Birds in the Footprints of Writing
  • Author: Raymond St. Elmo
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 296
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Clarence St Claire is a programmer who cherishes an orderly life His motto work is important people, not so much His determination to be The Most Serious Person on the Planet is threatened when he becomes haunted by a mysterious manuscript from his past 300 pages of possibly random bird tracks Risking his career and self possession, St Claire dares to pursue theClarence St Claire is a programmer who cherishes an orderly life His motto work is important people, not so much His determination to be The Most Serious Person on the Planet is threatened when he becomes haunted by a mysterious manuscript from his past 300 pages of possibly random bird tracks Risking his career and self possession, St Claire dares to pursue the manuscript against the opposition of hackers, the NSA, the ghosts of famous writers and doubts of his own sanity Lost in a maze of bird prints and their possible meanings, St Claire determines to summon the late writer Jorge Louis Borges to help with the translation He will dream Borges into existence, exactly as Borges wrote of doing But this act stirs the opposition of a secret order of past writers, who may, possibly, have their own agenda The duel between St Claire s reality and theirs leads to a final encounter in The Dark Library, before the dread conclave known as The Tribunal of Dreams Origins is a book about books, about magic realism and artificial intelligence, virtual reality and languages, and how sensible people wind up in strange situations by strangely sensible steps It is built of the words books whisper to each other alone after the library has closed It ends as it must with the hero tossed into a pit by Edgar Alan Poe Kidding I mean, that last does happen but the final ending is the hero finding the answer and getting the girl, as well as his sanity back Mostly back From the book I sat on the bed in the dark, my back to the wall I began a new web page Time to tell the world the truth, I thought, and felt a surge of pride This would upset the Secret Powers of the world But hey they had cost me my 400 security deposit It was payback time I would tell the world But tell what I typed out the flat truth to see how it looked There is a secret society of dead writers who live in the wall spaces between realities, in the silence of empty rooms, in the Schr dinger uncertainty of unopened books They call themselves the Tribunal of Dreams Often they appear as birds They peek out of mirrors and walk the shadows of libraries They are old and sly and are not retired They have vast plans They have me barricaded in my bedroom and they painted my windows black They are listening at the door now Send help I read it over several times It expressed all the facts nicely, yet it lacked something Specifically, it lacked the power to convince the world of anything except that I was insane.

    One thought on “The Origin of Birds in the Footprints of Writing”

    1. Raymond St. Elmo is a writer of extraordinary talent. I’d bet he has more than a little in common with the A.I. "Bob", who Clarence St. Claire, the protagonist in this novel, describes (with creatorly pride and despair) as “…a genius whose brilliance is a consuming fire devouring all the space of his mind.”There are more great lines in the first half of this novel than in the entirety of most of the novels I’ve read—even the good ones. Here’s an example, an extreme introvert’s fi [...]

    2. I can't remember how long I've been trapped in this library. I wander down one aisle after another, past long shelves lined with books. I pull one down at random. Hey, I remember this story--Lovecraft's The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath.Okay, maybe I'm dreaming. That's one explanation.Two aisles down, I see an old man with dark glasses running his fingers over the book spines. He turns toward me as I pass, but doesn't speak. It might be Jorge Luis Borges. Then again, it could be someone complete [...]

    3. From a very young age we’re expressly warned about judging a book by its cover, but y’know we do. Despite best intentions, it’s human nature. Having committed this misdeed with The Origin of Birds in the Footprints of Writing, I admit I probably wouldn’t have read this book if a friend hadn’t gifted me a copy. Moving past the cover, I was quite surprised by what lay inside. This is not an academic text. Far from it.The book follows the adventures of the eccentric Clarence St. Claire as [...]

    4. This was a fun story, full of geeky humor, which suited me just fine. It’s told from the perspective of a socially awkward programmer who becomes suddenly obsessed over a coded manuscript (‘coded’ here being used in the non-programming sense). I was especially fond of the office humor, which was very relatable. That said, to my personal tastes, I would have preferred more of the office humor and a little less literary humor. The protagonist spent a little too long isolated in his crazy wor [...]

    5. Okay, I don't really know how to write a review that will even begin to summarize this wonderful, thought-provoking and satirical story that had me staying up late at night and forsaking my children, job and wife because I just couldn't stop reading.This is a book that only comes along once every few years. It stands out from the millions of other stories on the shelves for it's uniqueness at delving into many things at a deep level, but they are handled in such a way that you enjoy going along [...]

    6. Wise, witty, wacky, wonderful. And that’s just the title. The Origins of Birds in the Footprints of Writing is the kind of book most readers only dream of finding, let alone actually having the joy of reading. Wildly amusing and at the same time thought-provoking, it’s a delight from start to finish.Narrated by a seemingly hapless hero named Clarence St. Claire, the book follows his trail of discovery after he is hired by the NSA and tasked with translating a secret document composed entirel [...]

    7. This story is told from Clarence’s pov. To everyone else he no doubt comes across as unsocial, paranoid, and a bit of a dick. But, we get to see the Clarence that’s witty, awkward, and maybe a little bit unbalanced (in an endearing sort of way), the Clarence that doesn’t know how to interact with people that might be his friends or not, and who spends way too much time in his own head.We meet Clarence mid-spiral, he’s working as a programmer on the AI “Bob” (that will ultimately answ [...]

    8. What do you want to read today? An epic struggle of the small man against corporate bureaucracy? An exploration of the implementation of Artificial Intelligence? A satire on geek culture? A hypertextual homage to Jorge Luis Borges, H.P. Lovecraft, Italo Calvino and Philip K. Dick? A Kafkaesque study in paranoia? A surreal capriccio in the style of Charlie Kaufman? A riff on the themes of translation and transcription? An ingenious cyber-espionage thriller? A study in obsession? A masterpiece of [...]

    9. This book is an adventure a metaphorical, magical tale that asks age old questions of purpose only to dig up age old answers in the form of never ending quests, that lead to more questions and before you know it, the answer is no answer at all, but a realization that the point of all of it is not that you found (or will find) an answer, but you had a hell of a time on the adventure while looking. Thus is life, right? It’s the journey not the destination. But Mr. St. Elmo has a way of writing t [...]

    10. This is my favorite book of the last five years, and the only one I've been really excited about lately. If I could find a book like this every month, omg I'd be the world's happiest reader. (ღ˘ᴗ˘ღ)Now why can't I find any more books this good when there's such a surfeit of indie novels out there? (-᷅_-᷄๑)

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