Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions

Tell Me How It Ends An Essay in Forty Questions Structured around the forty questions Luiselli translates and asks undocumented Latin American children facing deportation Tell Me How It Ends an expansion of her Freeman s essay of the same nam

  • Title: Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions
  • Author: Valeria Luiselli
  • ISBN: 9781566894951
  • Page: 198
  • Format: Paperback
  • Structured around the forty questions Luiselli translates and asks undocumented Latin American children facing deportation, Tell Me How It Ends an expansion of her 2016 Freeman s essay of the same name humanizes these young migrants and highlights the contradiction of the idea of America as a fiction for immigrants with the reality of racism and fear both here and back hStructured around the forty questions Luiselli translates and asks undocumented Latin American children facing deportation, Tell Me How It Ends an expansion of her 2016 Freeman s essay of the same name humanizes these young migrants and highlights the contradiction of the idea of America as a fiction for immigrants with the reality of racism and fear both here and back home.

    One thought on “Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions”

    1. Sharp, short essay that shines a light on how America treats undocumented children. Luiselli, who's an excellent writer (though emotion veers in and out of this piece in unusual cadence), has worked in the federal immigration system as a translator and cannily structures the essay around the 40 questions that she asked children when trying to pair them with a lawyer. The goal is less about making an argument and more about trying to re-shift the grounds of discussion by breaking down the dangers [...]

    2. “It is perhaps not the American Dream they pursue, but rather the more modest aspiration to wake up from the nightmare into which they were born."I wish I could force every person who chants "build a wall" or asks "why can't they just come here legally" to read this book. The 40 questions from the title are those Luiselli asks of detained children as a volunteer interpreter in federal immigration courts, and she uses this structure to give a concise, impassioned plea for us to recognize these [...]

    3. Ik kies ervoor om alleen verslag uit te brengen van een boek dat ik een aanrader vind. Je kunt maar beter energie steken in iets wat je zinvol vindt. Het lastige is dat ik soms niet meteen weet hoe ik van mijn leeservaring verslag moet doen.Afgelopen week hield de vraag me bezig waarom je ‘Vertel me het einde’ van Valeria Luiselli moest lezen. Of beter: ik wist wel waarom, maar hoe vertel ik het je?Ik ben al enige tijd fan van WoodsDoc (woodsdoc), een ‘nomadisch filmfestival’ dat in Antw [...]

    4. Review originally posted on A Skeptical Reader.In Tell Me How It Ends, Valeria Luiselli takes us through the process of reviewing undocumented children stuck in a limbo of red tapes. The book gives us a glimpse of the treacherous journey these children make when crossing the southern borders of the United States. And no, they are not rapists or drug dealers. They are victims of violence and the world needs to start recognizing them as such.It begins with a very structured form of storytelling. I [...]

    5. De grote kracht van dit boek (essay) is dat het de menselijke kant toont van de vluchtelingencrisis. Want in de parade van termen als de grenzen sluiten, illegalen en (vrijwillige) repatriëring vergeten we gemakshalve dat het om echte mensen gaat, op de vlucht voor een onleefbare situatie.Ik zou dit boek aan iedereen willen aanraden, maar helaas, diegenen die het zullen lezen zijn niet diegenen die het eigenlijk zouden moeten lezen.

    6. with gifted prose and a compassionate, but penetrating gaze, luiselli personalizes the ongoing plight of latin american child migrants in the united states. her own immersion as a translator informs a trenchant first-hand account of the labyrinthine legal processes and inevitable bureaucratic indifference faced by undocumented youth. humane yet often horrifying, tell me how it ends offers a compelling, intimate look at a continuing crisis – and its ongoing cost in an age of increasing urgency. [...]

    7. My review for the Chicago Tribune: chicagotribune/lifestySo much of the appeal of truly brilliant creative writing can be explained by the saying, "It's not what you say, but how you say it," and the way that Valeria Luiselli says what she has to say in her latest publication, the book-length essay, "Tell Me How It Ends," is simultaneously dazzling and apt.Subtitled "An Essay in Forty Questions," the book looks at an all too familiar and troubling topic in an utterly fresh yet appropriate fashio [...]

    8. i'm such a Valeria Luiselli fangirl. her prose is like honey on the tongue, it's sweet and syrupy and sticky, it's like a pantry good, some delicacy to always have in supply. it's a gift that as readers we are blessed to even have received. i'm serious. i'm a fangirl.unlike her novels, but also very much like her novels, this piece is afforded a considerable amount of brutality in its reading simply based off subject matter. not only is it concerned with our truly systemic horror show of an immi [...]

    9. On Page 96 of this work, as it begins to wrap itself toward no end, Luiselli writes: "There are things that can only be understood retrospectively, when many years have passed and the story has ended. In the meantime, while the story continues, the only thing to do is tell it over and over again as it develops, bifurcates, knots around itself. And it must be told, because before anything can be understood, it has to be narrated many times, in may different words and from many different angles, b [...]

    10. “Because-how do you explain that it is never inspiration that drives you to tell a story, but rather a combination of anger and clarity? How do you say: No, we do not find inspiration here, but we find a country that is as beautiful as it is broken, and we are somehow now part of it, so we are also broken with it, and feel ashamed, confused, and sometimes hopeless, and are trying to figure out how to do something about all that.”

    11. Desde su trabajo como traductora en una corte migratoria para niños centroamericanos, Luiselli construye un ensayo basado en las preguntas del cuestionario que le realiza a los niños; busca arrojar luz sobre la ignorada crisis de refugiados. Es un trabajo complicado para Luiselli, pues debe tomar esos silencios, lagunas de la memoria y terrores vividos por los niños, y traducirlos a algo cercano al español, luego traducir al inglés, para que así los niños puedan recibir o no ayuda legal, [...]

    12. 'Er zijn verhalen die je alleen maar kunt begrijpen als je ze in retrospectief bekijkt, wanneer er jaren overheen zijn gegaan en het verhaal al is afgelopen. Voordat dat het geval is, en zolang het verhaal nog verdergaat, is het enige wat je kunt doen het steeds opnieuw vertellen terwijl het zich ontwikkelt, zich opsplitst, met zichzelf in de knoop raakt. Want voor iets begrepen kan worden moet het vele keren verteld worden, in veel verschillende woorden en vanuit alle verschillende hoeken en do [...]

    13. qué diferencia brutal entre este ensayo --personal pero también político; continental o hemisférico; directo y sin florituras ni referencias literarias accesorias con el único fin de demostrar que su autor tiene muchos libros en su casa-- y algunos de los recientes ensayos mexicanos jóvenes --confesionales más que personales; provincianos con ínfulas de cosmopolitismo: "iba yo paseando en praga cuando"; clasemedieros, con todo y la presunta posición apolítica y las innumerables citas i [...]

    14. "It is not even the American Dream that they pursue, but rather the more modest aspiration to wake up from the nightmare into which they were born."This personal book is a wonderful way to learn more about the Central American children refugee crisis and, more generally, immigration in the US. The author shares her own experience as a high skilled Mexican immigrant while navigating the frustration of trying to help the kids escaping violence in their home countries and seeking asylum in the US. [...]

    15. A few years ago, an astonishing mass migration started--thousands of Central American children began traveling through Mexico to the United States, most of them unaccompanied by any adults. In fact they were searching for their adults--parents and other relatives residing in the United States. The pattern established by Mexicans, of crossing over and fleeing from Border Patrol through the underbrush was reversed; on reaching U.S. soil, the Central Americans actively sought out the Border Patrol [...]

    16. Important information, didn't care for the execution or organization, but still worth reading for an illuminating, if heartbreaking primer on our broken immigration system as it relates to the least of these.

    17. I can't wait for Valeria Luiselli to write a 500 page book so I can have the satisfaction of a book like this extended for a while.

    18. “Children run and flee. They have an instinct for survival, perhaps that allows them to endure almost anything. Just to make it to the other side of horror, whatever may be waiting for them.”“Because—how do you explain that it is never inspiration that drives you to tell a story, but rather a combination of anger and clarity? How do you say: No, we do not find inspiration here, but we find a country that is as beautiful as it is broken, and we are somehow now part of it, so we are also b [...]

    19. In over just 100 pages, this books tells us the story of undocumented children in the United States. Since the author has first-hand experience of what these children go through, she uses almost all of herself to bring the miseries of 'illegal children' to the fore. It is her own background, her own struggles with the Immigration that make her see the brutality of laws. Laws that can make children 'aliens', 'illegals', 'criminals' for being helpless, for being children.It is also an important bo [...]

    20. 'Hoe leg je uit dat je nooit door inspiratie wordt aangespoord een verhaal te vertellen, maar door woede en helderheid.' Valeria Luiselli

    21. Luiselli has such an important story to tell about some of the world's most vulnerable children and yet that hyper-conscious litfic "voice" subsumes their stories in her storyteller's diffidence. I read it. It horrified me. But I didn't feel much, always aware of Luiselli and the "telling" of it.

    22. Bijzonder mooi essay over de route die vluchtelingen uit Honduras, El Salvador, Mexico en Guatemala afleggen met la bestia tot in USA vanuit het perspectief van Valeria, vertrekkende vanuit het aanvraagformulier die men moet indienen om een verblijfsvergunning te bekomen. Die weg is bijzonder hard en het is onmogelijk dat de tekst je niet raakt of zelfs ronduit degouteert. Bijgevolg een broodnodig boek om NU te lezen, in deze tijdsgeest.

    23. Tell Me How It Ends is a MUST READ that all citizens should immediately read, and by all citizens, I mean citizens of the world. With unflinching honesty shrouded in sparkling prose, Valeria Luiselli paints a picture of many child immigrants and refugees fleeing their dangerous homelands of Central America that is unflinching. It is ironic that she, herself, fights for legal documentation during the same time period that she tirelessly works to be the voice for the voiceless.As teachers, we tell [...]

    24. Al principio, Luiselli explica qué le motiva: "¿Cómo se explica que nunca es la inspiración lo que empuja a nadie a contar una historia, sino, más bien, una combinación de rabia y claridad?". Habrá quien le reste peso por dejarse la emoción en las páginas. Pero ésta era la única forma posible (la única honesta) de contar esta historia.

    25. Luiselli's narrative of working with undocumented refugee children is a profoundly powerful, eloquent call to action. To knowledge. It would be an excellent addition to any high school or college class in the general humanities, English, US or World History, civics . . . I can't recommend it highly enough. She includes pieces of her own story as a Mexican writer living in the States, working towards a green card. She includes the hemispheric history--the wars, the trafficking in guns and people, [...]

    26. When one scrolls over the five stars to rate a book on , three stars means "I liked it" four stars means "I really liked it" and five stars means "It was amazing." I gave this book five stars, but not because it was amazing. It is heartbreaking, infuriating, depressing anda little bit hopeful. I read this book in an afternoon and thought: We are doing so many wrong things in this country, and we are doing them poorly, selfishly, indiscriminately, callously, obliviously. How many times in the las [...]

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