Venus and Adonis

Venus and Adonis Venus and Adonis is Shakespeare s narrative poem about the love of the goddess Venus for the mortal youth Adonis dedicated partly to his patron the Earl of Southampton thought by some to be the beau

  • Title: Venus and Adonis
  • Author: William Shakespeare Christa Jansohn
  • ISBN: 9783150182550
  • Page: 410
  • Format: None
  • Venus and Adonis is Shakespeare s narrative poem about the love of the goddess Venus for the mortal youth Adonis, dedicated partly to his patron, the Earl of Southampton thought by some to be the beautiful youth to which many of the Sonnets are addressed The poem recounts Venus attempts to woo Adonis, their passionate coupling, and Adonis rejection of the goddess, toVenus and Adonis is Shakespeare s narrative poem about the love of the goddess Venus for the mortal youth Adonis, dedicated partly to his patron, the Earl of Southampton thought by some to be the beautiful youth to which many of the Sonnets are addressed The poem recounts Venus attempts to woo Adonis, their passionate coupling, and Adonis rejection of the goddess, to which she responds with jealousy, with tragic results.

    One thought on “Venus and Adonis”

    1. Poor queen of love, in thine own law forlornTo love a cheek that smiles at thee in scorn!Males are pursuers and females pursued. Nowhere does this more in evidence than in the animal kingdom. In the act of copulation males offer and females accept; males give and females take; males perform the act, and on females, the act is performed. Or so goes the conventional view. But if evolutionary biology is to be believed, all species are obliged to spread their genes around to ensure continued existen [...]

    2. I have read quite a few of Shakespeare's plays, but hardly any of his poems or sonnets. I read an excerpt from Venus And Adonis in a book of poetry with horses as the main theme, and I became curious to read the entire poem.First I read at Wiki that Shakespeare was inspired by Ovid's Metamorphosis, which is on my Someday List and will now move up on that list because I want to read Ovid's version of the story. Once again according to Wiki, Shakespeare changed it in order to have Adonis refuse th [...]

    3. Well, That was different. Being Shakespeare, the poetry is lovely and imaginative and evocative, and even in this early work he is using language (rhetorical devices) with great dexterity and to good effect. But the story is more than a little silly. I read the introduction (I actually read this in a Folger edition, Shakespeare's Sonnets & Poems, and I dug out Metamorphoses and looked up Ovid's Venus and Adonis (which is quite different), and I still found Shakespeare's Venus to be so outrag [...]

    4. [] será el comienzo dulce, como el final insípido;/ y sea alto o bajo, jamás tendrá equilibrio.Breve reseña para un poema (no tan) breve. Me gustó más de lo que esperaba. Tuve mis momentos de duda porque la voz patéticamente enamorada de Venus puede volverse muy pesada, pero sobre el final cambia de cariz y todo va mejor. La historia es sencilla pero tiene muchas cosas bonitas en las cuales detenerse. Venus se enamora perdidamente del joven y hermoso Adonis e intenta seducirlo de todas l [...]

    5. Light and lovely with a slight comic touch emphasized by the three readers: Venus attempts to seduce Adonis but he would prefer to go boar hunting. This is the first poem I've ever read/listened to by Shakespeare, and perhaps Shakespeare is best heard than read. So I'm going to listen to more Shakespeare.

    6. This tells the bitter sweet story of Venus as she tries in vain to obtain the attentions of her true love Adonis. Written more as a narration by Venus than a 'typical' poem, it doesn't flow like you would expect, however the words are still as vivid and powerful as you would expect from Shakespeare. An enjoyable read, if you can manage to read to the punctuation rather than the rhymes, as Shakespeare intended.

    7. I think this deliberate meditation on incompletion fares much better than Marlowe's Hero and Leander--perhaps unfairly, since Shakespeare didn't drop dead before its publication, thus casting doubt on the poem's intended context.Shakespeare is also way funnier than Marlowe. Take that, Rupert Everett.

    8. Highly accessible poem, beautifully metered. Will remind you that Shakespeare deserves to be Shakespeare.

    9. This was written very beautiful and emotional but I didn't like the "plot" at all. Venus seemed to be really dislikable and annoying so that the reader didn't really care about her pain in the end

    10. I'm amazed at how many sayings we have nowadays come from Shakespeare. How different our language would be without him! This poem is sad but beautiful. I love reading the different works of Shakespeare.

    11. Read as part of 'The Oxford Shakespeare - Histories with the Poems and Sonnets, edited by Stanley Wells and Gary Taylor.I have never heard of the story of Venus and Adonis which as I found out, was originally written by Ovid in the 10th book of his Metamorphoses.In the summer of 1592, a terrible plague hit London, and the theatres were closed as to prevent further infection. This has forced Shakespeare to consider an alternative career, which led to the creation of his narrative poems, Venus and [...]

    12. Read this today and loved it. Here are some resources for you: william-shakespearefo/wbrivox/venus-and-adonis- (audio at the bottom).And here is some interesting commentary: quaternaryinstitute/plI was really surprised how approachable this poem was. The language didn’t feel archaic and I understood most of this beautiful poem. I love the imagery, metaphor, and sound in the poem. Shakespeare really puts you in the scene.I really like these lines:“No dog shall rouse thee, though a thousand ba [...]

    13. Excerpt from my blog post on Venus and Adonis:"Venus and Adonis is more like the bastard child of a sonnet and a play. Most of it is written as an ode, but it’s an ode that’s spoken by Venus within the narrative. Much of the poem is actually a conversation, which makes me wonder why it didn’t end up as a play instead.I think I have myself to blame for the level of discomfort I felt reading this poem. I never thought of myself as someone with a narrow view of poetry (or art in general), but [...]

    14. This poem tells the tale of Venus trying to make Adonis love her and her failure. The writing, as with all Shakespeare's works, is magnificent and beautiful. I don't usually like poetry, but I found myself liking this one. Anyway, better for you to read it for yourselves.

    15. Short review: Cougar godess Venus tries to put the moves on young Adonis but he's got things to do.Longer review to follow.

    16. Beautiful use of language, but the content really brings this poem down. Venus is wayyyyy too lusty over a very boring young and pouty Adonis.

    17. Shakespeare's 1200 line poem, 6 lines per stanza, seems meant to explain why love is so bittersweet.Venus seduces Adonis but after almost giving in, he resists and wants to go hunting. She is afraid he will be killed by a boar, and he is. In her grief, Venus prophesies, "Sorrow on love hereafter shall attend; It shall be waited on with jealousy, Find sweet beginning but unsavoury end all love's pleasure shall not match his woe" (lines 1135-40).The first half contains Shakespeare's strongest sexu [...]

    18. Venus and Adonis could be split into two clean halves with vastly different tones and the poem would improve for it. This was my second time reading the poem, and I still found my eyes glazing over with disinterest. It's most certainly a testament to Shakespeare's wordplay abilities, but it went on far too long to keep my interest — and the subject matter was not particularly interesting, either, despite its potential.The poem is that of Venus, the goddess who desires love, and Adonis, her you [...]

    19. This poem is sizzling with some really steamy imagery-it is Shakespeare after all. The comparison of love and lust is my favorite."Love comforteth like sunshine after rain,But lust's effect is tempest after sun;Love's gentle spring doth always fresh remain,Lust's winter comes ere summer half be done.Love surfeits not; lust like a glutton dies;Love is all truth; lust full of forged lies."

    20. One of Shakespeare's narrative poems. It's been about a year and a half since I read it, but I remember really enjoying it at the time. It's beautifully written. One thing I found entertaining was the fact that Venus was so lustful and domineering over Adonis. I would definitely recommend this to anyone who enjoys Shakespeare's plays.

    21. I found the reversal of stereotypical gender roles very interesting: the female goddess was pursuing the innocent human male. It created a unique layer to the story told in the poem. As always, Shakespeare wrote it beautifully.

    22. Quite passionate, but overly melodramatic. I can't help wondering how Elizabethans reacted to what must have been one of the raunchiest poems of its day.

    23. Fantástica narrativa do maior teatrólogo do mundo! Vênus, deusa do Amor, se apaixona por Adônis, que se interessa apenas pela caça. Ela tenta de todos os modos conquistá-lo mas ele, insensível a seus encantos, foge dela para a derradeira caçada. Essa poesia foi taxada de "manual de sedução" por muitos anos pelas insinuações amorosas: "Tolinho", diz, "se preso te conservo na esfera da marmórea paliçada, hei de ser parque, e tu serás meu cervo; em monte ou vale, pasta onde te agrade [...]

    24. This poem is one of Shakespeare's earliest works, but it already contains many motives that emerge in his later works, especially in comedies. I really enjoyed reading it; I think its humour works even for contemporary audience (although I would still recommend an annotated edition). The main topic is- of course - love, but here the woman (Venus) pursues a man (Adonis), and the quest is not free of humorous and embarassing situations. It is relatively short (compared to the comedies) and swift p [...]

    25. Charming little read, perfect for a midsummer quickie, the first work Shakespeare ever published. Whether you enjoy romance or to see love thwarted, this novel is for you. It has amazing, quotable lines for all sides of the fence-- for those in love, for those who wish to reject love, and almost everything about love by the goddess of love and beauty herself.

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