An Oblique Approach

An Oblique Approach Only three things stand between the Malwa and the conquest of Earth Byzantium the empire of Rome in the East a crystal that urges mankind to fight and Belisarius general of the Byzantine Empire and

An Oblique Approach Belisarius Eric Flint, David Drake An Oblique Approach Belisarius Eric Flint, David Drake on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Only three things stand between the Malwa of northern A Primer On Oblique Strategizing Introduction The Oblique Strategies are a deck of cards Up until , they were quite easy to describe They measured about x They came in a small oblique strategies cards Description Created by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt, Oblique Strategies were originally a set of cards The cards were intended to help artists and musicians overcome Cervical spine AP oblique view Radiology Reference The AP oblique cervical spine projections are supplementary views to the standard AP, odontoid and lateral c spine series It can be taken either as an anterior How to Treat a Pulled Oblique Muscle Steps with Pictures How to Treat a Pulled Oblique Muscle The oblique muscles are located on the sides of your abdomen, between your hip and your rib cage There are two sets of oblique Core training part I Inner and outer unit Functional The posterior oblique system In the posterior oblique system the gluteus maximus is connected to the Latissimus dorsi of the opposite side through the thoracolumbar Risen Takes a Novel But Grim Approach to the Familiar Risen plays out like a no nonsense procedural Risen Takes a Novel But Grim Approach to the Familiar Crucifixion Tale Angle In plane geometry, an angle is the figure formed by two rays, called the sides of the angle, sharing a common endpoint, called the vertex of the angle Angles formed Guillotine A guillotine l t i n French is an apparatus designed for efficiently carrying out executions by beheading The device consists of a tall Room Mode Calculator Axial, Tangential, and Oblique MC M c Squared System Design Group, Inc West rd Street, North Vancouver, BC VP P Ph Kensington Rd NW, Calgary, AB.

  • Title: An Oblique Approach
  • Author: David Drake Eric Flint
  • ISBN: 9780671878658
  • Page: 484
  • Format: Paperback
  • Only three things stand between the Malwa and the conquest of Earth Byzantium, the empire of Rome in the East a crystal that urges mankind to fight and Belisarius, general of the Byzantine Empire, and arguably the greatest commmander the Earth has ever known.

    One thought on “An Oblique Approach”

    1. Some of the best-written trash I've ever read. Trash, by the way, is a perfectly legitimate genre. There is good trash and then there is bad trash. Never turn down the opportunity to read good trash.This is pulpy, ridiculous, muscular, high-adventure alternate history with totally implausible science fiction trappings. In fact, "An Oblique Approach" is a horrible misnomer. They should call it, "A Shameless Approach." I don't think this book cares at all about historical accuracy, plausibility, O [...]

    2. 1. This is really Eric Flint writing from David Drake's outline.2. Compare to S.M. Stirling writing from David Drake's outline in the Raj Whitehall Series.3. It's great stuff. Great characters, great action, interesting technology and speculation.4. If there is a primary fault, I think it's spreading the action too thin - there are always multiple plot lines to follow (as might be expected from a multi-national war and conspiracy plotline), and I found myself wondering on occasion which bizarre [...]

    3. This is a review of the entire six-book alt-historical military fiction series (there does not appear to be an omnibus edition that I can attach it to, sigh).It's very much light literature: there is a science-fictional justification for the authors' mucking about with their historical setting, but it's silly and not really very important anyway. I strongly suspect they basically went "wouldn't it be cool if we could give the great Belisarius gunpowder technology and see what he'd do with it", a [...]

    4. I had rather hoped I would hate this book. Seriously. Many years ago, when I first purchased my Kindle, I downloaded dozens of books from the Baen free library. That included the first four books in this series. Those books, along with many other free/cheap books that I downloaded around that time period, have resulted in an overwhelmingly large list of books that I’m still trying to work my way through. So I thought, if I didn’t like this book, then I could delete the other three books and [...]

    5. Typical Eric Flint: inventive story, great storytelling.Historical fiction in only the loosest sense of the term, An Oblique Approach uses the persons and places of the sixth century as a springboard to a fanciful, fun adventure. Along the way, Flint's protagonist (Belisarius, arguably the best field commander in history) collects the usual--for Flint fiction--band of allies and followers and takes on the world. Unlike Guy Kay's Sarantium Mosaic series, Flint doesn't delve deeply into the comple [...]

    6. OkayI know you guys are all rolling your eyes at the cover/synopsis to this bookd it is hideously nerdy and silly sounding, but since I resignedly watched the ashes of my Cool Card blow away in the wind many years ago this was a really fun and rewarding book. It combines a few genres to interesting effect, being a kind of "alternate historical science fiction" mutant beast. It's about the famous Byzantine ("Wahhh they considered and called themselves Romans and there was arguably no discernible [...]

    7. The mix of Drake's driving battlefield action and Flint's combination of deep philosophy and charming irreverence makes for a great read.This is very much in the heroic fantasy mode with larger-than-life characters though the underpinnings are SF. On one level it’s an alternate history romp across the ancient world with rapidly evolving technology. On another it’s a philosophical essay on the very meaning of humanity.The idea that core ‘human’ values like Freedom, Compassion, Curiosity a [...]

    8. Read at least (3) timesI think I read this series more than that too, but I can't remember exactly, this is at least my third time reading it though.I talked to my dad for the first time today and cried a little during the conversation. He was glad! I called and told me that he wants me to be happy. It's amazing feeling wanted like that. I'm still avoiding doing my homework though XD. I'm really glad I chose to read this again while I was going through this, reading about good people, being *peo [...]

    9. I thought I had read this previously, but I was incorrect. This is the first book in a six-volume series about Belisarius, one of history's greatest generals, and how he saved the future [although not quite the future as we know it]. It starts off with "smallish" cast of characters, which then swells a bit before shrinking, and then the cast breaks up into disparate parts to further enhance the play. I think it has pretty decent character development in it, overall. Obviously, in such a large no [...]

    10. the only 'purpose' of this trashs existence is because Americans love to get obese on drinking eating sucking being fucked by bullshitese idiots even called Andy Warhol an artist.

    11. Read this several years ago. Really enjoyed it and immediately checked the next book in the series out of the library.

    12. I'm going to let this review cover my thoughts on the series as a whole, just so I can sum up my thoughts on it in one place.Let's begin with the pros. It's a fun series, above all else. Sometimes it really is fun to watch unambiguously good people beating the crap out of unambiguously evil people. Real life is complicated, so it's somewhat cathartic, to my mind, to be able to experience a less complicated world. Yes, it's not realistic, but if I wanted to be reading something realistic, I'd be [...]

    13. This was tough to understand for the first few chapters. I think this was mostly because I am unfamiliar with the historical era the action is happening in. I did a bit of research into the Holy Roman Empire and what the rest of the world was like during the early days of Christianity (thank you ), and suddenly I wasn't confused any more. If you have trouble understanding what is going on that early on, I'd suggest doing the same thing.As to the story itself, I really, really, liked it. It's the [...]

    14. I can't decide if this is a totally underrated series or if I should feel slightly guilty about liking it as much as I do. Probably both. It's historical sci-fi, which is a subgenre I can't always get into, as I'm not particularly a history geek, and it's also almost pure military porn, which I like rather more than I can explain.The best thing about the book is the banter. It's totally anachronistic, but it's funny, and for pure pulp like this, that's all I care about. The second-best thing abo [...]

    15. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. I really liked the characters, especially their portrait of Belisarius. The way the story unfolded, how they would reveal some things but not others, was creative and enjoyable. I look forward to seeing how the story and the characters develop as the series unfolds.

    16. Good subject matter, and to my shame I'd never heard of this general before. I know who he is now thanks to this book.The book itself well, it's not exactly alternative history a la Turtledove but intriguing enough to make me read the entire thing.Belisarius was a brilliant Byzantine General who defeated the Persians who were pushing on the borders of the Eastern Roman Empire. Rome is gone as a power and Justinian the present ERE Emperor hopes to reclaim the old empire.The General becomes aware [...]

    17. Picked this up from Baen's free electronic library. I've read stories by both Drake and Flint in the past, or at least collaborations, but never really followed either author. I was therefore really pleased to find myself enjoying this story so much. (And even more so to find that the next several volumes are also free at Baen!) I've remarked in the past that I've learned more history from so-called alternate history (especially Turtledove Harry and Neal Stephenson) then I ever did from school.A [...]

    18. Alternative history is a strange kind of world. The authors will spend months, if not years researching real life events, real life characters, plotting maps and following conquests that happened in humanity's history. Then they will purposefully twist their own work by imagining a single event while splits the timeline into uncharted territory and create a narrative following the exploits of the real life figures who lived in that time. A lot of work goes into these what-if imaginings and it sh [...]

    19. A lot of historical fiction attempts to make the story realistic by using accurate, actual slang and recreating the actual style of speech. Unfortunately, that language and manner of speech usually appears stuffy/antiquated/bizarre/etc to modern readers. So the language pulls a very different reaction from readers than it would have from people in the time period the story takes place in. (I hope that makes sense.) At any rate, Flint and Drake don't use much period terms or attempt to mimic the [...]

    20. In northern India the Malwa have created an empire of unexampled evil. Guided or possessed by an intelligence from beyond time, with new weapons, old treachery, and an implacable will to power, the Malwa will sweep over the whole Earth. Only three things stand between the Malwa and their plan of eternal domination: Byzantium. The Empire of Rome in the East. Compared to what the Malwa are creating, think of it as Camelot.A crystal with a vision. It brings a warning for all mankind regarding the M [...]

    21. Military SciFi/Alternate history in which an evil empire appears in India in the fifth century. Famous historical general Belisarius receives a warning from the future and must counter the threat. This series goes deeper into philosophical and poetical tangents than similar works. Eric Flint’s classic wry humour pervades the prose. The books can almost be read as historical novels and contain quite a few interesting tidbits about the period. The series consist of: An Oblique Approach In The He [...]

    22. I reread this book in 2012. This review reflects that.This review applies to all of the books in the Belisarius series by Eric Flint and David Drake. I read them all quickly, in a row, and there’s honestly not a whole lot of difference in the elements that make them good books. You get the best mix of David Drake’s detailed outlines, sense of pacing, action sequences, and depth of historical knowledge with Eric Flint’s ability to manage description and nuances of character that Drake isn [...]

    23. The entertaining and gripping tale of Belisarius, a fifth-century general of the (Eastern) Roman Empire under the emperor Justinian. And yet, it's not really historical fiction, as there's a science-fiction twist that significantly changes things. Technically, saying more about the twist would be a spoiler; however, it's mentioned right on the front cover (at least of the paperback edition I have), so it's not exactly going to be a surprise for most readers. Still, try not to read the outside of [...]

    24. An Alternate History/SciFi/Sword&Sorcery adventure that is not West-centric. The hero happens to be the great captain of the Eastern Roman Empire, Belisarius of the time of Justinian in the Sixth Century A.D. The opponents representing both the old terrors of the "eastern hordes" and the alien influenced masses, the Malwa of northern India. Soon to be allies include a young prince of a Sudanic Nile kingdom and his two elite guardsmen and former Persian enemies. For me a perfect mix of histor [...]

    25. Well Done. Very well done, in fact. David Drake and Eric Flint do a wonderful job of taking historical fiction (or, psuedo-historical fiction, anyhow) and weaving in character and plot development that pays the reader back for his attention.Kudos, also, to Tor/Baen, and their approach to e-books. The first three books in the Belisarius series are available as free downloads from the publisher, and I'll definitely be spending my money on the following books, directly from Baen.

    26. Well, 4 stars, eh? Yes, indeed, and it all comes down to characters. The plot is a big, rambling, horribly padded thing, and it is really just shameless how much foot dragging goes on to make sure this is a multi.volumeries. However, I liked each and every character in this story, and I find myself wanting to see what happens to absolutely every one of them next. That counts for a hell of a lot in my corner, and it handily overcomes some awkward writing and eye-rolling attempts at posturing atti [...]

    27. The historical accuracy is highly suspect, the characters improbably modern, but the entertainment value of this story is undeniable. Unlike too many authors of this genre, Flint and Drake manage to create competent and believable antagonists with which their protagonists have to contend which in turn makes for a better plot containing enough struggle and tension to create suspense and not simply conflict. In essence this series is an old fashioned adventure story with some almost cosmetic eleme [...]

    28. I wasn't sure at first I was a big fan of the writing style; it seemed a bit juvenile. But the book grew on me. Set in the world of the Byzantine empire during Emperor Justinian's rule (527–565 AD) the story is centered around Belisarius, a brilliant general who historically played a large part in expanding the empire during his time as a general in the empire's military.Ultimately I really enjoyed the story. Filled with bits of humor and great plot twists, it proved to be a highly entertainin [...]

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