God and General Longstreet: The Lost Cause and the Southern Mind

God and General Longstreet The Lost Cause and the Southern Mind More than a century after Appomattox the Civil War and the idea of the Lost Cause remain at the center of the southern mind God and General Longstreet traces the persistence and the transformation of

  • Title: God and General Longstreet: The Lost Cause and the Southern Mind
  • Author: Thomas Lawrence Connelly Barbara L. Bellows
  • ISBN: 9780807120149
  • Page: 249
  • Format: Paperback
  • More than a century after Appomattox, the Civil War and the idea of the Lost Cause remain at the center of the southern mind God and General Longstreet traces the persistence and the transformation of the Lost Cause from the first generation of former Confederates to recent times, when the Lost Cause has continued to endure in the commitment of southerners to theirMore than a century after Appomattox, the Civil War and the idea of the Lost Cause remain at the center of the southern mind God and General Longstreet traces the persistence and the transformation of the Lost Cause from the first generation of former Confederates to recent times, when the Lost Cause has continued to endure in the commitment of southerners to their regional culture Southern writers from the Confederate period through the southern renascence and into the 1970s fostered the Lost Cause, creating an image of the South that was at once romantic and tragic By examining the work of these writers, Thomas Connelly and Barbara Bellows explain why the nation embraced this image and outline the evolution of the Lost Cause mentality from its origins in the South s surrender to its role in a century long national expression of defeat that extended from 1865 through the Vietnam War As Connelly and Bellows demonstrate, the Lost Cause was a realization of mortality in an American world striving for perfection, an admission of failure juxtaposed against a national faith in success.

    One thought on “God and General Longstreet: The Lost Cause and the Southern Mind”

    1. Uneven. More like 3.5 stars. Impressionistic, argumentative, and opinionated - seemingly a series of essays, stitched together but never given a thorough editing into a coherent monograph, Connelly and Bellows' book is marred by frequent redundancies, spotty and sometimes missing transitions, and thus wanderings around in search of places to touch down.That said, the icon-shattering Connelly, presumably the pricipal author - and author as well of the controversial iconoclalstic biography The Mar [...]

    2. It isn't so much a book as a series of essays. As such it can be repetitive and hard to follow. It also assumes a huge knowledge of the South and the literary tradition of it. Lastly, it really has little to do with Longstreet despite its title.

    3. Barely mentions General Longstreet. Gives almost as much attention to Elvis. And has anyone noticed the author’s love of the word “renascence?” I lost count at 20, but it occurred sometimes three times on a page and multiple times in a single paragraph.

    4. The book cover’s flap tells us “God and General Longstreet traces the persistence and the transformation of the Lost Cause from the first generation of former Confederates—who cloaked their defeat in religion and, in the process, elevated Robert E. Lee to a postwar saint at the expense of General James Longstreet—to the present day when the Lost Cause continues in the determined commitment of southerners to their regional culture.” That it does, although I found it to be a confusing re [...]

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