Jasper Johns: Privileged Information

Jasper Johns Privileged Information Fusing criticism and biography this work offers insight into the life and work of America s pre eminent living artist Assigned to write a review of Jasper Johns s The Seasons a series of paintings t

  • Title: Jasper Johns: Privileged Information
  • Author: Jill Johnston
  • ISBN: 9780500017364
  • Page: 497
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Fusing criticism and biography, this work offers insight into the life and work of America s pre eminent living artist Assigned to write a review of Jasper Johns s The Seasons, a series of paintings that would be acclaimed at the 1988 Venice Biennale, Jill Johnston became intrigued by a mysterious detail in each of these paintings which is designed to look like a jigsaw pFusing criticism and biography, this work offers insight into the life and work of America s pre eminent living artist Assigned to write a review of Jasper Johns s The Seasons, a series of paintings that would be acclaimed at the 1988 Venice Biennale, Jill Johnston became intrigued by a mysterious detail in each of these paintings which is designed to look like a jigsaw puzzle piece She found the source of this detail in Grunewald s 16th century masterpiece, the Isenheim Alterpiece and it was this image, of a grotesquely diseased and dying man, that helped Johnston unlock an autobiographical core in Johns s work Whereas most critics have been impressed by the formal qualities of Johns s paintings, Johnston discovers riches of personal meaning throughout his art She charts the evolution of Johns s artistic, personal and public identities, from his family roots in South Carolina though to the early 1950s when Johns, together with Rauschenberg, Cunningham and Cage, overturned assumtions about modern art, dance, music and theatre She interviewed many figures associated with Johns and had several enigmatic encounters with Johns himself.

    One thought on “Jasper Johns: Privileged Information”

    1. An enjoyable read with some interesting biographical information. However, Johnston occasional goes too far in her strained iconagraphical read of Johns' works. To suggest that the Flag paintings were an allusion to an American war hero of the artist's namesake is absurd and runs completely against why Johns was so important in the late 1960's: the absence of artist and the utilization of neutral signs like the flag or text was a radical departure (or progression) from Abstract-Expressionism. No [...]

    2. Overall, an interesting insight into Jasper's life. The author addressed his background and family in a pertinent way, as well as unearthed some discoveries, correlations, etc. about his work. I learned a lot about Jasper and his era. My biggest beef is that NONE of his works were included. I mean, this is a book about an artist and his ART. One cannot expect to fully grasp the depth and critique of his work without instant access to it. Very frustrating.

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