Destry Rides Again

Destry Rides Again Famed fighter Harry Destry comes back from jail a changed man The town thinks he no longer has what it takes to defend himself but Destry s innocent act covers a plot for vengeance against the men wh

  • Title: Destry Rides Again
  • Author: Max Brand
  • ISBN: 9780671735432
  • Page: 232
  • Format: Paperback
  • Famed fighter Harry Destry comes back from jail a changed man The town thinks he no longer has what it takes to defend himself, but Destry s innocent act covers a plot for vengeance against the men who set him up.

    One thought on “Destry Rides Again”

    1. First of all, forget the film. Aside from the title, film and book are quite different. This is a better than average pulp western and, as is the case with many of Brand's westerns, has an anti-hero in search of an identity. In addition Destry is focussed on revenge and his main antagonist is his closest friend. The plot is well constructed with well drawn subsidiary characters and provides a number of interesting twists.All in all this is an enjoyable and undemanding work.

    2. I'm really not into Westerns. I find them dull and pretty boring. But I actually kind of liked this revenge story. Which is actually the best compliment I can give it.

    3. Harry Destry is a proud and boastful punk who likes to go around proving he can out-ride, out-shoot, and generally out-do any man he meets. He gets blamed for a train robbery he didn't commit, and the jury sentences him to prison because they don't like him. When he gets out of prison, he sets about ruining or killing them and if you're thinking this sounds like a western version of "The Count of Monte Cristo," well, I thought so too. And, as that's my second-favorite book of all time, I very mu [...]

    4. I always thought most westerns were a bit shallow. This is an exception. I don't know Max Brand's stories but I like this tale. It has some very good prose, some interesting details of western life that I didn't expect and an outcome I thought I had anticipated but didn't. Two things to watch for, one is his "vulgar" language. His characters speak as the times dictate. The second thing, along those lines, is his use of misspelled dialect. This is a particular bone of mine but in the 30s this was [...]

    5. Harry Destry is you typical western ne'er do well good at fighting and causing trouble with a few friends and mounting enemies. When the express gets robbed outside of town, and his enemies decide to be rid of him by blaming him for it, well, a few months to relax in the slammer sounded just fine until he found it would be 10 long years. Destry returns a broken man but it's quickly revealed as just a front, and his new mission in life is to punish the 12 jurors that send him to prison.As is typi [...]

    6. One of the greatest.One of the greatest western authors of all time. Max Brand leads the reader on a very authentic tale of the old west the way it was. Max Brand books as always leaves the reader wanting more.

    7. This is the book that only shares title with the classic Jimmy Stewart Western of the same name. Otherwise, there is nothing the same here. The book came first and it is completely different. It would be a classic pulp western, or in modern terms a Men's Adventure Western. The story is at is bare bones a story of revenge by a man who was innocent of a crime and he finds ways to kill, chase out of town or arrest the jurors that sent him to jail in legal manners. The longer version of the story wi [...]

    8. It's hard to choose, but I'd say Brand is a slightly more engaging writer than Western favorites Owen Wister, Zane Grey and Louis L'Amour, but if so, not by much. This is pulp writing, with way too many exclamation points trying to punch up cliched phrases and purple prose. The story focuses on Harry Destry--even he describes himself as "a waster, a lazy loafer, a fighter." What he comes across to me is a thug, happy to find any excuse to use his fists--and this is our hero.He's framed for a tra [...]

    9. This is my new favorite Max Brand novel. Neatly plotted and briskly told, it illustrates Brand’s remarkable gift for storytelling. It begins with the usual western conventions and then quickly posits a premise that strikes off in one unexpected direction after another. Maybe most remarkably, it defies convention by presenting an indomitable but flawed hero whose estimation of himself is mightily revised by the end of the novel.His first flaw is a nearly fatal blind spot in his choice of friend [...]

    10. Very disappointed with this book. Like Man from Laramie, I read this to compare it to the movie of the same title, starring Jimmy Stewart and Marlene Deitrich. Unfortunately, the only thing the two have in common is the title. The book is a fairly standard western, but with a nice twist: the hero, out for revenge, does not want to kill his opponents, he wants to destroy them in unique ways. It's actually the plot of almost every slasher movie out there. However, I am not that big a fan of wester [...]

    11. Destry Rides Again (1930) is the Max Brand classic and it really is well done of it’s type. Excellently paced, this has little to do with any of the sound film versions. Maltin credits “the story by Max Brand” but there is little left but the title that I can see. Maybe a little bit in common with a rip snorting gunfighter masquerading as a milquetoast. Destry gets framed for a train robbery, goes to prison, and returns to the town of Wham (yup, ya heard me right) seeking revenge on the tw [...]

    12. I read this because Billy Parham was reading it in Cities of the Plain. It was pretty much what I expected - a simple story with very little suspense or drawn-out plot twists, and certainly nothing that isn't easily predictable. Overall, it's not a bad look at what people were reading back in the '30s. If nothing else, Destry does prove to be a slightly less stereotypical character, and I'd love to find the time to trace his kind of character through pulp westerns, but that's likely a long proje [...]

    13. What a surprise of a fun book! I think this is the first proper Western I've ever read and I loved it. Granted, it's no literary masterpiece, but I must say it was a blast to turn the pages.This fast-paced story is about a tough rebel named Destry who is sent to prison for years, serving time for a crime he did not commit. Once out, he aims to seek revenge on the 12 jury members who sent him to prison. However, his mission isn't to kill but to find other unique ways as punishment and to make the [...]

    14. The James Stewart western classic was based on this tale of an outlaw done wrong who comes back seeking vengeance on the jury who wrongly sentenced him. It has been a while since I watched the movie, but the book didn't remind me much of what I remembered from it. That being said, the book was a very enjoyable read.

    15. Very enjoyableI decided to read this after watching 'Destry' with Audie Murphy on TV. I knew this would be very different and it was very good. I don't recall watching the Jimmy Stewart 'Destry Rides Again', but wanted to read the book first.

    16. A simple, fun straight-forward Western with good guy running into trouble but in the end comes out ahead and wins his girl. This one was the start of Jimmy Stewart's career. Thanks, Tina and Harlan for sending it along to me!

    17. Destry has spent six years in jail for a robbery he didn't commit. Now, in plotting his revenge, he returns to town to rid himself of those who served on the jury. But death is too good for them. He has other plans. Wonderful and witty.

    18. Pretty good. Fairly standard western, with a dash of a mystery thrown in. Brand did wax a little too poetical about sagebrush a couple of times, and took an entire chapter to talk about a horse, but I don't expect much from my westerns except that they be readable.

    19. Sometimes I hope the movie follows the book. This time I am glad it doesn't. Only the title remains the same. Now to enjoy the movie. 1939, starring James Stewart and Marlene Dietrich.

    20. This was absolutely nothing like the Jimmy Stewart movie or the Audie Murphy movie. But I did enjoy it: it was a man's man's western novel! It was written for pure escapism.

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