The Misanthrope, Tartuffe, and Other Plays

The Misanthrope Tartuffe and Other Plays This unique volume brings together four of Moli re s greatest verse comedies covering the best years of his prolific writing career Actor director and playwright Moli re was one of the fine

  • Title: The Misanthrope, Tartuffe, and Other Plays
  • Author: Molière Maya Slater
  • ISBN: 9780192833419
  • Page: 324
  • Format: Paperback
  • This unique volume brings together four of Moli re s greatest verse comedies covering the best years of his prolific writing career Actor, director, and playwright, Moli re 1622 73 was one of the finest and most influential French dramatists, adept at portraying human foibles and puncturing pomposity The School for Wives was his first great success Tartuffe, condemnedThis unique volume brings together four of Moli re s greatest verse comedies covering the best years of his prolific writing career Actor, director, and playwright, Moli re 1622 73 was one of the finest and most influential French dramatists, adept at portraying human foibles and puncturing pomposity The School for Wives was his first great success Tartuffe, condemned and banned for five years, his most controversial play The Misanthrope is his acknowledged masterpiece, and The Clever Women his last, and perhaps best constructed, verse piece In addition this collection includes a spirited attack on his enemies and a defense of his theater, in the form of two sparkling short plays, The School for Wives Criticized and The Impromptu at Versailles.

    One thought on “The Misanthrope, Tartuffe, and Other Plays”

    1. Moliere is funny. In all of my theater classes in college during which I never read anything (other than Master Plots summaries and other people's notes) I never really paid much attention to the things we were supposed to do. It makes me sad to think that now that I have read some plays I should have read 11 years ago, I have no one to talk to about how damn funny they are, oh well, life lessons!

    2. I'm not the greatest fan of theater and I'm not very good at reading plays. I tend to be underwhelmed by them. Moliere's are no exception. That being said, I did enjoy them. I just didn't find them to be brilliant which is more a shortcoming on my part than his, I'm sure.

    3. Very clever speeches, some of which were brought into the film Moliere. I particularly like the Misanthrope who always speaks his mind and when asked his opinion of a poem starts gently in the third person with "I tried to tell this friend not to write any more". Also the incident where the young couple are singing to the father about loving eachother on the pretext of it being a singing lesson. Has to be acted to be appreciated. There is one play about wife being beaten with a stick by her husb [...]

    4. I just read Tartuffe and I have to say I liked it. Moliere raises some interesting ideas, reality vs. appearance, hypocrisy vs piety, and how even true piety can lead people astray. I can see the revolution brewing. I also want to mention that Slater, very bravely, translated the French into rhymed couplets. I loved that.It was fun to read, reminded me of Dr. Seuss.

    5. Well, this is sort of a lie because I didn't read the entire book - I only read Tartuffe. Haha! Maybe some day I will read the others, but for now, I only wanted to re-read Tartuffe. It's such a fun play! I really like the characters. The fact that it all rhymes is kind of fun too, but at times, gets annoying. I'd love to be in a production of this. I think it'd be a lot of fun.

    6. LOVE Moliere, he's like a French Oscar Wilde, very witty and satirical. Tartuffe is hilarious, and so is The Imaginary Invalid. Good 'reading' plays, as opposed to plays that are best on stage only. The language in these is so rich that it practically reads like a novel.

    7. I really enjoy all of Moliere's work. He's funny; even being so long ago, the comedy holds. I saw School for Wives and nearly laughed my head off, especially when the actors over-acted, which I could picture Moliere doing on stage; all part of the satire.

    8. Actually, not so much recommending this specific book as much as I am recommending reading everything by the man. I would say if you have never read anything by him, to start with Tartuffe, where you can get an instant appreciation for his (beautifully barbed) insight into human nature.

    9. I read "The School for Wives" for a theatre class. The social commentary is intriguing as it deals with the issue of femininity from the male's perspective. Women, despite being a minority and socially subjugated, hold the most power in this play by virtue of the male fear of cuckoldry.

    10. Hilarious and enlightening. I understand a lot more about French humor, and even the odd affection for Lewis, now.

    11. Tartuffe's an interesting play-- yet it ends rather abruptly, as if Moliere decided, I need to end this thing. = ]

    12. Written in french prose, but elegantly translated into English without butchering the delicate rhyme schemes.

    13. Translated to English, but still in the original poetic form: 12 syllables per line in rhyming couplets. I Don't know why they left out "The Mider," except to sell another book.

    14. This wasn't one of my favorites. Perhaps it was the play formate but I didn't understand what was going on at all.

    15. I only read Tartuffe, it was a quick read, and I definitely understand the family's irritation, but it wasn't the greatest thing I've ever read.

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