How Experiments End

How Experiments End Galison provides excellent histories of three experimental episodes the measurement of the gyromagnetic ratio of the electron the discovery of the mu meson or muon and the discovery of weak neutral

  • Title: How Experiments End
  • Author: Peter Galison
  • ISBN: 9780226279152
  • Page: 208
  • Format: Paperback
  • Galison provides excellent histories of three experimental episodes the measurement of the gyromagnetic ratio of the electron, the discovery of the mu meson, or muon, and the discovery of weak neutral currents These studies of actual experiments will provide valuable material for both philosophers and historians of science and Galison s own thoughts on the nature of exp Galison provides excellent histories of three experimental episodes the measurement of the gyromagnetic ratio of the electron, the discovery of the mu meson, or muon, and the discovery of weak neutral currents These studies of actual experiments will provide valuable material for both philosophers and historians of science and Galison s own thoughts on the nature of experiment are extremely important Galison has given both philosophers and historians much to think about I strongly urge you to read this book Allan Franklin, British Journal of the Philosophy of Science Anyone who is seriously concerned with understanding how research is done should read this There have been many books on one or another part of its subject matter but few giving such insights into how the research is done and how the consensus of discovery is arrived at Frank Close, New Scientist Galison is to be congratulated on producing a masterpiece in the field Michael Redhead, Synthese How Experiments End is a major historical work on an exciting topic Andy Pickering, Isis

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    1. To do a history of science, ask a historian who is also a scientistJDN 2456442 EDT 15:48.A review of How Experiments End by Peter GalisonIt seems so obvious in hindsight, but most things do. If you want a really good history of science, you need a historian who is also a scientist. Galison fits the bill; he has PhDs in both physics and history. How Experiments End is, as such, the finest history of science I've ever read.Unlike most historians who write about science, Galison has the proper resp [...]

    2. Experiments are hard. There are lots of little details. At every point, the experimenter needs to decide to (A) decide that they are confident enough in their results to publish them, (B) keep tweaking the experiment and try to remove more sources of error, or (C) give the whole thing up.In this book, Peter Galison traces the details of that decision in several major physics experiments of the 20th century -- work by Einstein and others on measuring the gyromagnetic ratio of the electron, the di [...]

    3. Brilliant book, denying the division between capricious discovery and rule-governed justification, Galison takes on the task of of neither producing rational rules for discovery - a favourite philosophical pastime - nor reducing the arguments of physics to surface waves over the ocean of professional interest or parodying it as if it were no more grounded in reason than negotiations over the price of a street fair antique. Galison successfully shows that the task at hand is "to capture the build [...]

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