Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism

Woman Native Other Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism odologically innovative precise and perceptive and conscious Text and Performance Quarterly Woman Native Other is located at the juncture of a number of different fields and disciplines and it gen

  • Title: Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism
  • Author: Trinh T. Minh-ha
  • ISBN: 9780253205032
  • Page: 225
  • Format: Paperback
  • .odologically innovative precise and perceptive and conscious Text and Performance Quarterly Woman, Native, Other is located at the juncture of a number of different fields and disciplines, and it genuinely succeeds in pushing the boundaries of these disciplines further It is one of the very few theoretical attempts to grapple with the writings of women of.odologically innovative precise and perceptive and conscious Text and Performance Quarterly Woman, Native, Other is located at the juncture of a number of different fields and disciplines, and it genuinely succeeds in pushing the boundaries of these disciplines further It is one of the very few theoretical attempts to grapple with the writings of women of color Chandra Talpade Mohanty The idea of Trinh T Minh ha is as powerful as her films formidable Village Voice its very forms invite the reader to participate in the effort to understand how language structures lived possibilities Artpaper Highly recommended for anyone struggling to understand voices and experiences of those we label other Religious Studies Review

    One thought on “Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism”

    1. Had to read the first chapter for one of my classes: when it was time to discuss it in said class only one snide comment of "how am I supposed to get her point if I can't understand her writing" was needed to awaken a crowd of angry classmates with knives drawn, hungry for blood. I was taken completely aback—out of all possible critiques this is one I quite frankly hadn't expected, this is grad school, for heaven's sake!—and finally, admittedly feebly, offered up the remark that within the c [...]

    2. Beautifully written. It took me a little while to get the hang of her writing style, but once I did, I truly appreciated her creative and unique prose.

    3. Trinh T. Minh-ha's writing is an embodied practice that is to say Min-ha writes from her specific standpoint position in society. Minh-ha argues that feminism needs to make room for cultural, racial, national, and gender differences. She, like many "intersectional" feminists, believes that carrying the "sign" of woman should not be used as a universal "sameness." Minh-ha contends that differences amongst individuals who identify feminists must make room to speak out against hegemonic power relat [...]

    4. The way in which Minh-ha composes is now a demonstration of Derridean deconstruction in which she obscures the limits between so-called scholarly and abstract written work styles. She utilizes graceful dialect to pass on the free play of significance without sticking to the strict account structures of formal study. Woman, Native, Other is situated at the point of various distinctive fields and disciplines, and it really succeeds in pushing the limits of these disciplines further. It is one of t [...]

    5. What. A. Book. Necessary reading for all, especially those looking to understand intersectionality to a greater extent. Although the style of writing is a bit difficult to get used to (quotes and I/i etc are frequent), perseverance leads to experiencing a really wonderful and interesting book.

    6. Another reviewer posted the following as a negative review: "no words". I feel the same, but change it to a non-negative; this text is in the realm of my own not understanding, but there is strength in the words that I am not sure I understand. Is this poetry, a novel, literary criticismybe it is all of that, as a story, an important one.

    7. This is quite a scattered text, and although it revolves around the same ideas it is structurally disjointed. Its wit and at times attacking qualities make it a solid performative work, but its content is lacking in a way that I can not pinpoint.One is face to face with a constructed binarism (thinking Sedgwick here) where the "other" is made into an "another" by "difference". Minh-ha criticises the "white male anthropologist", in that he wants to gain knowledge about "the other" which he makes [...]

    8. This book is very dense but once you get to the third chapter of the book you get a better sense of what it is she is trying to convey.

    9. Minh-Ha's writing style can at first take some getting used to. At first, her writing felt a little like waxing poetic, but the book reveals itself to be very substantive in no time at all.I haven't read that much theory, so I didn't know what to expect when I first started it. The post-colonial angle caught my eye, especially as an Asian American girl.I wasn't disappointed-- a very insightful read that covered a broader range of topics than I thought it would.The book is divided into four secti [...]

    10. I loved this book. Minh-ha has a wonderfully engaging writing style that both makes the reader feel as though they're part of a discussion and challenges them to answer questions she brings forth. This book is particularly helpful for anyone who has a strong interest in post-colonialism and would like an entry point into writing within that framework. Minh-ha presents a well researched narrative that is illuminating in how contemporary it is, but also humbling and appreciative of her predecessor [...]

    11. Re-read this book after years since my first read in college and loved it more than ever. I purposefully took it slow, enjoying Minh-ha's every poetic word and circling around the critical concepts with a more mature mind. And while some of the ideas could use some updating, it's a theoretical text I could read again and again.

    12. Difficult to read if you are expecting a classic second wave feminist text, but that is precisely the point. Cyclically written, with a loopy (literally) logic to it, a great step into the brave new world of Post-Colonial Feminism for the uninitiated. Also a perfectly lovely read for those of us who are already there.

    13. Difficult read, but once you understand the style you realize what a lovely, sarcastic, angry, rational, and beautiful book it is.

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