Street Rod: a Story of a Young America's Passion for Speed

Street Rod a Story of a Young America s Passion for Speed Ricky Madison s parents were as square as the Cleavers or the Nelsons Ricky s friends were allowed to have their own rods but would his parents let him in on the fun Heck no So here he was the only

  • Title: Street Rod: a Story of a Young America's Passion for Speed
  • Author: Henry Gregor Felsen
  • ISBN: 9780394917009
  • Page: 435
  • Format: library binding
  • Ricky Madison s parents were as square as the Cleavers or the Nelsons Ricky s friends were allowed to have their own rods, but would his parents let him in on the fun Heck no So here he was, the only guy in Dellville without his own set of wheels, the town car suck His friend Link said he ought to threaten to leave home That worked for Link he had his rod But RicRicky Madison s parents were as square as the Cleavers or the Nelsons Ricky s friends were allowed to have their own rods, but would his parents let him in on the fun Heck no So here he was, the only guy in Dellville without his own set of wheels, the town car suck His friend Link said he ought to threaten to leave home That worked for Link he had his rod But Ricky s parents weren t so easily bluffed, and though his father finally did decide that Ricky should be allowed to have a car, Ricky s mind was already made up Before his Dad could tell him he d had a change of heart, Ricky went and bought a beat up 39 Ford coupe from Merle, the somewhat shady town mechanic, with crazy dreams of souping it up to be the best street rod in town.

    One thought on “Street Rod: a Story of a Young America's Passion for Speed”

    1. I rarely read Young Adult books when I was a child in the 60s because I found them to be insipid and condescending. The topics that could get past the censors and PTA were very limited. This novel, Street Rod was a major exception and one of the few YA novels good enough to remember from my youth. The novel about a teenage boy who wanted a racing car was a precursor to the S. E. Hinton books. In my opinion, it was better. Perhaps the major thing going for it was a downbeat ending that would prob [...]

    2. I read this book when i was 10 years old. I was shocked senseless by the ending. I remember looking around the front room. Everybody else in the family was behaving normally. They had no idea what I had just experienced. I walked upstairs to my bedroom with the book. Several times over the next few weeks I re-read the ending and was shocked all over again.This book then led to a lifetime of seeking and enjoying to the max any and all books with shocking endings. And, even more, books that are fi [...]

    3. "The eye-opening novel about street-rodders -- the kids who build and drive the stripped-down, souped-up bombs on wheels!"Now, I ask you, with a cheesy teaser come-on like that on the cover, how the hell could I resist? I bought this thing hell, yeah! 1950s hot-rod pulp exploitation at its finest -- kids hopped up on wicked chocolate malts, peeling out and displacing loose gravel like hellions lobbing firecrackers at the unwary squares of Dellville, Iowa, USA, daring the cops to stop 'em comin [...]

    4. I read this many times as a young teenager and was always moved by this story. I think I read it again and again, hoping for a different ending, but always knowing what was going to occur on the final pages. This was my favorite of the "Hot Rodding" books by Henry Gregor Felsen.

    5. I read this way before I ever learned to drive and yet it managed to capture my attention even back then.

    6. I wrote this review back in 2009 under my old name and old account. But I just deleted that account, and I want my review to stay. So here it is again. I stand by what I said. :)When I found out my dad had never read The Outsiders (which I love and have read with my seventh graders every year for the past 10 years) I gave him homework. After he read it, he said it reminded him of a book that was popular when he was in high school. The library couldn't keep it on the shelf; every boy he knew read [...]

    7. This book is set in the '50s and has a lot of slang and phrases from the time period. I think it was very relevant for that time and accurately depicts teens in the '50s. The characters are interesting and I began to feel for both the teenagers and their parents. I'd recommend this book to anyone who likes cars because it describes a lot of car maintenance.

    8. I found this book in the school library in 1960 while in the fifth grade in Dearborn, Michigan. While most self-respecting hot-rodders painted their cars black, the main character's girlfriend talks him into a color scheme of pink, brown, and copper. This little instance of zigging while others zag, and its contribution to a tragic ending, have stayed with me ever since.

    9. I have read most of Felsen's "car" books. I read them in the early 80's. I loved them. I was into the car culture. They had the strong moral story of tragedy.

    10. Morality play, using a teen romance and a "speed kills" message. It's much like the hot rod exploitation flicks of the same era.

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