The Butter Did It

The Butter Did It It is the eve of City Tastes Washington D C s gourmet gala featuring the delectable handiwork of the city s culinary stars Renowned restaurant reviewer Chas Wheatley expects to fill her biting Washi

  • Title: The Butter Did It
  • Author: Phyllis C. Richman
  • ISBN: 9780061096259
  • Page: 108
  • Format: Paperback
  • It is the eve of City Tastes, Washington, D.C s gourmet gala featuring the delectable handiwork of the city s culinary stars Renowned restaurant reviewer Chas Wheatley expects to fill her biting Washington Examiner column with reports of a sassy soupe en chamise or a poor palourde en beignets But when chef Lawrence Levain s heart suddenly stops the night before thIt is the eve of City Tastes, Washington, D.C s gourmet gala featuring the delectable handiwork of the city s culinary stars Renowned restaurant reviewer Chas Wheatley expects to fill her biting Washington Examiner column with reports of a sassy soupe en chamise or a poor palourde en beignets But when chef Lawrence Levain s heart suddenly stops the night before the event, everyone is quick to name his soaring cholesterol as the culprit Except Chas, whose discriminating senses smell murder Armed with her saber sharp pen and critic s eye for things amiss, Chas circuits the restaurant scene, doling out biting reviews and delicious recipes, while probing into Lawrence s untimely demise With a dollop of help from her loved ones at home and a soupcon of advice form a secret admirer at work, Chas s tastebuds lead her down a dangerous trail of revenge and murder, where her next bite could be her last.

    One thought on “The Butter Did It”

    1. This was a highly entertaining book about a restaurant reviewer trying to figure out the murder of a past lover who was a notable Chef. We are introduced to Chas Wheatley, working for the Washington, D.C. newspaper, Examiner. Chas is a divorced woman with one child who is an adult. Chas is in charge of her life, she is still friends with her ex-husband, Ari, a famous chef himself. Chas is also in a relationship that is at that difficult stage of either committing or moving on. Chas' daughter, Li [...]

    2. Suppose one of the nation's best known, most trusted and widely read restaurant critics turned her writing talents to crafting a culinary mystery? Phyllis C. Richman was the food critic of the Washington Post for nearly thirty years. Known for her sometimes extravagant disguises, intended to prevent restaurateurs from recognizing her, she avoided being photographed to preserve her anonymity. Drawing on her insider's knowledge of restaurants, she wrote The Butter Did It: A Gastronomic Tale of Lov [...]

    3. The Butter Did It by Phyllis Richman is the first Chas Wheatley Mystery book. Chas Wheatley is a food critic and restaurant reviewer for the Washington Examiner. When her friend chef Laurence Levain dies, it is initially thought he has suffered a heart attack and Chas is instrumental in pointing the police correctly to murder, and she is herself then targeted by the murderer. I enjoyed this book very much, especially all the food descriptions. The murderer was a bit obvious and Chas seemed a bit [...]

    4. As a first novel, this book was okay. There was nothing that made this book stand out from others in this particular genre theme. It became a bit boring at times but not overly boring. I enjoyed the many food references made through out the book. The main plot/story line was good but the characters were not all that interesting. This book is what I classify as an "in betweener", a book you read in between your favorite authors or as a break from your regular reading schedule. The story centers a [...]

    5. Chas (aka Charlotte Sue) Wheatley is the restaurant critic for the Washington Examiner writing the obituary for Laurence Levain, a well-known Washington chef. What is not known is that Chas and Laurence are friends and had been lovers back in Paris in their younger days. Laurence is found dead from an apparent heart attack the night before a big food gala called City¬Tastes. The death scene has been made to look as if he had been entertaining a woman before he died, but Chas has personal inform [...]

    6. #1 in the Chas Wheatley series. Finalist 1997 Agatha Award for Best First Novel. First of a short (3 entries) fun series, followed by Murder on the Gravy Train (1999).Wash. DC restaurant critic Chas Wheatley series - Washington's finest French chef, Laurence Levain, is dead, and all of D.C. thinks the culprit was too much foie gras. All, that is, except for Chas Wheatley, the city's most famous restaurant critic. Still carrying a torch for Levain after a passionate romance they shared years befo [...]

    7. Another semi whiney female with lots of relationship issues. Reporter who is the restaurant critic for a DC paper whose former husband is a caterer and whose former lover is killed. At first she is just a link in the chain of evidence but then she chooses to investigate further. One stumble after another and she finally gets the answer. The food concept has been overdone but she is a newsperson with friends and family with various skills. So we will try #2 and see if this is worth further reads. [...]

    8. This has a catchy title and LOTS of characters. The food critic in D.C. sets off to solve the mystery of the death of her good friend and one time lover, Laurance Levain. There are any number of suspects, and we meet her daughter Lily, ex-husband and now gay chef, Ari, as well as Marcel, Marie Claire, people at the newspaper and a police detective, Homer. This book seems to bog down toward the end, and has a little too much padding. There is an interesting sounding dessert recipe at the end.

    9. This was a quick and entertaining read. The mention of all the restaurants, their chef's and the goings on and between them all was fun to read. However, the main character was a bit lacking in any serious "character" for my taste. She was a little too self absorbed, couldn't seem to be happy with the man in her life and her daughter appeared to be bitter and resentful. I didn't love the ending either, it seemed like it was added almost as an after thought as apposed to an actual ending to the s [...]

    10. With such great promise, this was quite disappointing. Too many red herrings. Too many side stories. And particularly annoying are the patronizing explanations to tell the reader the source of quotes. Surely most readers are familiar with "You're a Christian Martyr" from The Glass Menagerie. Also most tedious was the main character's life story, as well as the rather cliche-ridden descriptions of food.

    11. I know mystery novels are sometimes rather thin - this one certainly felt so - and admittedly they are generally not my thing. But it was fun being reminded of the food fashions of 20 years ago (fresh pasta everywhere, stacks of vegetables, the rise of mesclun, Nutella still hard to get), when I was working at Whole Foods.

    12. It was entertaining and never boring. Although light it explored complex relationships with a sophisticated eye. The author is clearly intelligent and talented. She knows her way around food and wine. It was never annoying and cloying and it never caused me to suspend my disbelief.

    13. A wonderful murder mystery wrapped up in the world of cooking, this book was both a great read and an interesting look into the mind of a real life restaurant critic. If you like a good mystery that keeps you guessing at every turn (and I sure was!) then this book is meant for you.

    14. It was a nice read. It wasn't the best book in the world, but definitely nice enough to keep me interesting. A cute murder mystery that was refreshing.

    15. I really wanted to like this book. Love food and familiar with dc. But the book felt it was cooked with no fat no sugar and no spices.

    16. Interesting look at restaurants and restaurant critics in D.C. Chas isn't really a very good sleuth or very good at men, but it was entertaining.

    17. Written at a 6th grade level - like most newspapers. Characters annoying. "Investigation" developments totally unrealistic. Waste of time.

    18. Light and enjoyable plus I live in the Washington area where it's set and I've read Ms. Richman's restaurant reviews in the Washington Post for years. One warning - you will get hungry reading this.

    19. A harmless entertaining mystery filled with chefs and fine food. More romantic yearning than clever sleuthing, but not bad.

    20. Entertaining mystery. I wish I had cared more about the main character. I probably would have liked the book better if she were more likeable.

    21. A wonderful culinary mystery. The book is peppered with tasty tidbits and culinary jargon. Who new a food critic had so much clout? Loved it.

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