The Drum, the Doll, and the Zombie

The Drum the Doll and the Zombie When Johnny Dixon Professor Childermass and Fergie Ferguson have a party for their friend Dr Coote they expect the evening to be a blast and it is but not quite the way they have in mind As Fergie

  • Title: The Drum, the Doll, and the Zombie
  • Author: John Bellairs Brad Strickland Edward Gorey
  • ISBN: 9780803714625
  • Page: 454
  • Format: Hardcover
  • When Johnny Dixon, Professor Childermass, and Fergie Ferguson have a party for their friend Dr Coote, they expect the evening to be a blast and it is but not quite the way they have in mind As Fergie pounds out a rhythm on a small drum, a howling wind shakes the house and something explodes Soon Johnny, the professor, and Fergie are in a battle with the fearsome PriestWhen Johnny Dixon, Professor Childermass, and Fergie Ferguson have a party for their friend Dr Coote, they expect the evening to be a blast and it is but not quite the way they have in mind As Fergie pounds out a rhythm on a small drum, a howling wind shakes the house and something explodes Soon Johnny, the professor, and Fergie are in a battle with the fearsome Priests of the Midnight Blood for Dr Coote s life and their own.

    One thought on “The Drum, the Doll, and the Zombie”

    1. This is a YA horror, a posthumously finished novel of the Johnny Dixon Series. A fun 1 day read. There's not much depth in this single novel. Perhaps there is more in the series as a whole. It reads rather like a Golden Age horror which I find a plus. One likes the kids and the professors.

    2. 3 1/2 stars. I quite enjoyed it! Although sometimes I felt like I wanted a little more depth or details, the book moved along at a good pace. I liked Johnny Dixon and I liked the spooky, scary story. This was my first John Bellairs book; I'd been wanting to read one of his for a while now, and this was completed by another author. I'm looking forward to reading one completely written by Bellairs, and also to reading more in the Johnny Dixon series.

    3. I read the book aloud to my son to the end of Chapter 9. He picked it up himself and finished it off, because he didn't want to wait for me. The writing is pleasantly complex, with more details than seems to be the norm today. Challenging vocabulary also offers opportunities for vocabulary building without bogging down the story. I will definitely pick up more books by this author for my son to read.

    4. As with 'The Hand of the Necromancer', I really enjoyed Strickland's handling of the Bellairs characters. He brings out the crankiness of the professor (and even uses the professor's proclivity for ranting as a plot point near the end of the book), and he also explores some of the secondary characters, like Charles Coote and Johnny's dad, who provides a thoughtful little sub-plot for Johnny. Strickland is a pro at preserving the world created by Bellairs while imagining new details of his own. T [...]

    5. Enjoyed this but it had a much more modern feel that the others - is that Strickland's influence? Also, I always thought Fergie lived in a poorer part of town but In this book it is described as 'snooty'. ???

    6. Not terrible, writing is competent, some parts quite suspenseful, but middle lag really got to me. Might go back to it, might not.

    7. Johnny and Fergie are once again drawn into a spooky and mysterious situation. One that includes zombies!Professor Childermass' friend Dr. Coote brings a strange looking drum over, looking to find out more about it. It has strange images drawn on it and there are bones around it to help keep the drum heads on. Is it involved in a supernatural world? Will it cause harm? And just what is 'voudon' all about?The friends find themselves going to a graveyard to get answers and discovering a real zombi [...]

    8. Although Johnny Dixon is my favorite of Bellairs' protagonists, the evil voodoo flavor of this novel doesn't really do him justice. The zombie is a pretty lackluster element, and the "evil voodoo" angle is troubling in its characterization of indigenous religions. Strickland takes pains to establish that this particular brand of voodoo is evil because it is in the service of a fascist dictator, but it doesn't quite lift the feeling of slightly racist cliche. Kudos to Strickland, however, for dan [...]

    9. I loved this book. This is actually a book for kids - maybe junior high age. But I loved it anyway. It is a gothic horror book with very likable characters (at least the good guys), great settings, and a sensible plot in its own way. I've always loved John Bellairs' books. This is one that was finished by Brad Strickland after Bellairs' death, and it is true to the spirit and style of John Bellairs.

    10. Good, but not the best. Professor Childemass must deal with a colleague who has been rendered catatonic by a voodoo curse. Johnny as always helps him out. It's brief, but spookier and more serious than usual kid's lit. I'd probably pick another, earlier book to start out with if you are new to the series, but it's spooky fun that doesn't try to explain everythign away.

    11. Like so many books on my bookshelves, I have no idea when specifically I read this one, but like all the Bellairs/Strickland collaborations, I was fond of it. This is one of the crazier ones, as the prerequisite raising of the dead and necromantic forces were tied to a poorly timed Ricky Ricardo impersonation. Voodoo, crusty old codgers, and New England nostalgia combine as per usual.

    12. I loved John Bellairs as a kid, and re-reading these books as an adult has not disappointed me. These books are not sugar coated, the stories are actually terrifying, and Bellairs' nods to Tolkein and Lovecraft and his other predecessors are delightful. Johnny Dixon is my favorite protagonist, and Brad Strickland did a wonderful job completing this book.

    13. Short but sweet. I really enjoyed this and it just flew by. I liked all the characterizations and the plot was really cool. I'm intrigued that this was an unfinished Bellairs - it's the first time I've read him but I definitely want to read more. I'll be curious to see if I notice a difference. Very glad I picked this one up.

    14. John Bellairs books are the children's book equivalent to comfort food for me. Anytime I pick one up, I like it just as much as I did in 5th grade. This one is not a true Bellairs, but still it was entertaining and a lovely grilled cheese sandwich for my brain.

    15. This is the last book Bellairs wrote concerning Johnny Dixon before his death, and it was later completed by Brad Strickland. The story elements are pure Bellairs, and the ending doesn't feel as rushed as some of the other Strickland-completed novels. Still an amazing read.

    16. Great book to read in the month of Halloween! Zombies and scary rituals of voodoo! While this was a book that Bellairs started, a friend and fan of his (Strickland) helped finish the book. I feel he did a great job at finishing it off.

    17. old fashioned melodramaThis is an old fashioned melodramatic short novel I got on Book Bub. It seems written for peculiar young adults not fussy about good writing. This is number 9 in a fairly long series. Don't bother I say.

    18. Grades 5+. Thirteen-year-old Johnny Dixon and his friend Prof. Childermass try to save the life of the elderly Dr. Coote, and find themselves facing the forces of menacing voodoo cult.

    19. I think this is one of my favorite series of books. A very whimsical plot, fun characters and events, a great, easy read.

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