A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life

A Hidden Wholeness The Journey Toward an Undivided Life In A Hidden Wholeness Parker Palmer reveals the same compassionate intelligence and informed heart that shaped his best selling books Let Your Life Speak and The Courage to Teach Here he speaks to ou

  • Title: A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
  • Author: Parker J. Palmer
  • ISBN: 0723812624201
  • Page: 353
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In A Hidden Wholeness, Parker Palmer reveals the same compassionate intelligence and informed heart that shaped his best selling books Let Your Life Speak and The Courage to Teach Here he speaks to our yearning to live undivided lives lives that are congruent with our inner truth in a world filled with the forces of fragmentation Mapping an inner journey that we take iIn A Hidden Wholeness, Parker Palmer reveals the same compassionate intelligence and informed heart that shaped his best selling books Let Your Life Speak and The Courage to Teach Here he speaks to our yearning to live undivided lives lives that are congruent with our inner truth in a world filled with the forces of fragmentation Mapping an inner journey that we take in solitude and in the company of others, Palmer describes a form of community that fits the limits of our active lives Defining a circle of trust as a space between us that honors the soul, he shows how people in settings ranging from friendship to organizational life can support each other on the journey toward living divided no This paperback edition includes two new and useful features Circles of Trust is a DVD containing interviews with Parker J Palmer and footage from retreats he facilitated for the Center for Courage Renewal CourageRenewal Bringing the Book to Life, by Caryl Hurtig Casbon and Sally Z Hare, is a reader s and leader s guide to exploring the themes in A Hidden Wholeness The DVD illuminates and illustrates the principles and practices behind circles of trust The guide includes questions that connect the DVD to the book, offering a conversation with the author as well as an engagement with the text Together, these features give readers new ways to internalize the themes of A Hidden Wholeness and share with others this approach to sustaining identity and integrity in all the venues of our lives.Inspired by Palmer s writing and speaking and challenged by the conditions of twenty first century life people across the country, from many walks of life, have been coming together in circles of trust to reclaim their integrity and help foster wholeness in their workplaces and their world.For over a decade, the principles and practices in this book have been proven on the ground by parents and educators, clergy and politicians, community organizers and corporate executives, physicians and attorneys, and many others who seek to rejoin soul and role in their private and public lives.A Hidden Wholeness weaves together four themes that its author has pursued for forty years the shape of an integral life, the meaning of community, teaching and learning for transformation, and nonviolent social change The hundreds of thousands of people who know Parker Palmer s books will be glad to find the journey continued

    One thought on “A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life”

    1. why why why did I buy this? Did someone rec it to me? I have zero recollection, and yet here it is in my hand as a thing that I own Got to page 19, and could stomach no more.

    2. A family member gave me this book as a Christmas gift. She knows that I am at a spiritual crossroads, exploring how to recover my personal balance.What this book describes is a specific method, referred to as circles of trust, in which people bring their solitude into a community. This is one way for individuals to find integrity between our core selves (which he calls "souls") and our roles (including our jobs).I was especially touched by Palmer's description of the soul as most like a wild ani [...]

    3. He had me at, "No fixing, no saving, no advising, no setting each other straight," which is the main rule of the "circles of trust" he describes. Most conversation at family gatherings, church coffee hours, break and conference rooms at work, etc. tends to be of the fixing/advising/persuasion variety, with plenty of complexes tossed into the mix. Palmer gives insight into how to instead speak one's truth and engage in "deep speaks to deep" type of listening.I appreciated his reminder that most o [...]

    4. With his Quaker background and worldview, Palmer has learned to place a great confidence in the "inner teacher" that is within each of us, otherwise known as the "soul". He suggests that the only path to an "undivided life" in which soul and role are joined is to provide space for the soul to speak. I especially appreciated his advice "on "letting things alone" in the lives of other people. In our ego driven attempt to instruct and advise others on how they should live their lives, we leave othe [...]

    5. "' is better to be whole than to be good.'" - John Middleton Murry (p. 8)"The deeper our faith, the more doubt we must endure; the deeper our hope, the more prone we are to despair; the deeper our love, the more pain its loss will bring; these are a few of the paradoxes we must hold as human beings. If we refuse to hold them in hopes of living without doubt, despair, and pain, we also find ourselves living without faith, hope, and love.' (p. 82)"The divided life is a wounded life, and the soul k [...]

    6. I had to read this for one of the graduate classes in my doctorate program. I liked some ideas here such as Palmer's belief that we all have secret lives as children where we go inside ourselves to find the true authentic core and try to quietly pursue that then become divided more and more each year as we grow up and become adults and have our inner authentic "real" selves and an outer shell we put on to make ourselves appear to be what society and other people expect us to be. He also discusse [...]

    7. The "divided self" refers to the compartmentalization by which we create character or behavior that differs from who we feel we really are. Palmer's practical response is the Quaker "circle of trust" in which a small group witnesses each other's suffering and confusion and seeks to provide clarity, especially through attentive silence, without attempting to "fix" others. These groups work best if there is a skilled facilitator who operates with non-hierarchical leadership and can preserve the de [...]

    8. I've been meaning to read some Parker Palmer, and wound up choosing this one simply because it was available as an audio book and was about the length of a long drive I had to make. The book is primarily focused on the logic behind and the procedures involved in "Circles of Trust," a method of group interaction Palmer relies on to help people discern the direction their lives should take. Palmer runs a retreat center that allows people to come and participate in such Circles of Trust. The book e [...]

    9. I appreciated this book. I didn't take away exactly what Parker Palmer intended, probably. But this week after I finished it, I found myself in situations where I thought, "Honor this person's soul," which, to me, is a deeper way of remembering to honor and respect people in everyday encounters, recognizing they're in progress, just like I am.Palmer details the Quaker practice of "circles of trust," along with "clearness committees," for much of the book, which I didn't realize gong in. I like m [...]

    10. I was fortunate to be reading this book during this election season. Palmer spends much of the book describing circles of trust, a specific group that gathers to help someone who is struggling to come to terms with an issue. There are strict behavior guidelines that do not allow those in the circle to give advice, but rely on those in the circle to be present and ask open questions and be there for that person to find their own truth. Even if you aren't intending to participate in a circle of tr [...]

    11. I took issue with a few of the ideas Palmer put forth but for the most part, it was incredibly challenging and thought provoking. Helpful and practical - a pressing counter-cultural approach to the "fixing" mindset that pervades our relationships with one another. I would like to hear from P. Palmer about whether he thinks there are times for confrontation or wise counsel and how to discern those times and handle them in way that is less invasive. For the purposes of this book though, very clear [...]

    12. Parker Palmer is a man with a soul, and he discusses the congruity between who we are inside and the work we do in the "outer" life--and it's importance for sanity. We live in a time when pressures from all sides seek us to become what someone or some system wants of us for their advantage. Palmer's work is both a plea to avoid this sickness as much as it discusses some "how-tos" to make this happen.

    13. Again, due to unusual circumstances, I was unable to finish this book. Parker Palmer's only fault is his propensity to assume that the reader's experience mirrors his own. His insight into elements of human compassion, and his capacity to apply Quaker practice and principles to everyday human interaction for everyone and within community in particular, are delightful and useful.

    14. Really great visual illustrations on Integrity and Wholeness as a person and why adults seem to lose this once we leave our childhood. The concept of Vocation vs Career was also powerful in that it reminds us of "calling" as something that is beyond just our jobs or tasks.

    15. Very influential in introducing me to Parker Palmer and Quaker thought. I keep this on my iPod and listen to again and again from time to time. Palmer is a thoughtful, wise and insightful mind.

    16. Did I love this book fully, or did I just wish to become like Parker Palmer? Did I resonate with it fully, or just wish to climb into its pages and have its poetry and thoughtful spirituality become me? Did the book speak to me on a soul-level, or did my ego wish to be associated with this movement and approach? I guess, regardless, this is an absolutely gorgeous work. This book is about living the undivided life. Being the same person inside as you are on the outside. Resolving the dissonance t [...]

    17. Another gem from Parker J. Palmer.This book starts with an exploration of why it matters that people connect with their whole selves and the inner authority that speaks within them and then offers tools for communities to support individuals hear the quiet inner voice of truth.Perhaps the most important part of the book is his gentle unfolding of his understanding of that part of a human's being that gets called inner authority, soul, the muse, etc depending on the tradition. Not only does he ho [...]

    18. I did not know that a "circle of trust" group even existed. It is very needed in today's world. I like the approach, that the leader create a safe place for the soul to open up. Also, there is no demand that you have to speak. I am shy and I know I would need time to listen and trust. The whole idea is to help each person to listen to his inner teacher. To get in touch with yourself.Also, we need solitude and community to make us whole. I spend a lot of time alone, and I know that without any fe [...]

    19. Parker Palmer consistently delivers thoughtful, intellectually honest books that speak directly from his personal experiences and reflections. In this book, he talks about the concept of a Divided Life and how to work toward being less divided. Anyone who lives in today's world will easily see how we end up being multiple people and how this is not the ideal state. HE continues discussing Quaker Clearness Committees that can help people involved in sorting out difficult issues or in discerning t [...]

    20. Parker Palmer opens the book by saying: "This book brings together four themes I have been musing on since my mid-twenties: the shape of an integral life, the meaning of community, teaching and learning for transformation, and nonviolent social change." And he ends the book with a line from Mary Oliver's poem, "When Death Comes": "I don't want to end up simply having visited this world."Suggesting the value of what he calls a "circle of trust", Palmer takes us step by step through the meaning of [...]

    21. I love Parker Palmer. Next to Wendell Berry, he's probably the closest to be an author who doesn't wast words. Let Your Life Speak is in my top 5 non-fiction of all time. that being said, I flirted with three stars. The book starts strong and ends strong. The middle section is pragmatic. Parker describes the mechanics of the trust circle with thorough detail. Not unhelpful, but not what i was looking for. Still, i liked the book and gleaned wisdom, because how can you not when Parker Palmer spea [...]

    22. This book is full of Humanistic thought centered on "the goodness in all of us". What the book lacks is Scriptural truth. Wholeness doesn't come from some group where we live out our solitude together. It comes through the redemption offered only through Christ.

    23. I love Parker Palmer's work! I first read Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation and was very inspired by his inward focus to outward contribution. This book digs into that idea a bit more, focusing on how to build Circles of Trust to coax one's soul out of hiding in order to live "divided no more". This means that our inner and outer lives are one and what we do is in line with who we are. If that sounds like a dream, I encourage to you start the journey to discover yourself b [...]

    24. In A Hidden Wholeness, Parker Palmer reveals the same compassionate intelligence and informed heart that shaped his best-selling books Let Your Life Speak and The Courage to Teach. Here he speaks to our yearning to live undivided lives-lives that are congruent with our inner truth-in a world filled with the forces of fragmentation.Mapping an inner journey that we take in solitude and in the company of others, Palmer describes a form of community that fits the limits of our active lives. Defining [...]

    25. In A Hidden Wholeness Parker Palmer explains that to have our divided lives become whole we need community. This view of community has a particular shape to it. First is to understand and acknowledge that we live divided lives. Second, we look at how we started out as children living an undivided life that became divided when we started to ignore our own truth. Third, we realize that to rejoin our soul with our role in life we need to combine our solitary journey with relationships to others. Fo [...]

    26. I picked this book up in the spring, when I was tired and a little cranky about teaching, so I had deliberately held off reading it over the summer. However, as the school year started, I felt the need to get myself into a head space for teaching, so this was the right book for me at the right time . While he is used by a great many other people in a great many other set of vocations, Parker Palmer is best known for his work with education and spirituality and that is what I needed to hear about [...]

    27. "By violence, I mean any way we have of violating the identity and integrity of another person. I find this definition helpful because it reveals the critical connections between acts of violence large and small, from dropping bombs on civilians halfway around the world to demeaning a child in a classroom. Most of us live our lives in the home or classroom or workplace. We play bit parts in the great global drama. But the choices we make in the micro arenas of life contribute, for better or for [...]

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