The Half-Life: A Novel

The Half Life A Novel When Cookie Figowitz the cook for a party of volatile fur trappers trekking through the Oregon Territory in the s joins up with the refugee Henry Brown the two begin a wild ride that takes them

  • Title: The Half-Life: A Novel
  • Author: Jonathan Raymond
  • ISBN: 9781582345789
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Paperback
  • When Cookie Figowitz, the cook for a party of volatile fur trappers trekking through the Oregon Territory in the 1820s, joins up with the refugee Henry Brown, the two begin a wild ride that takes them from the virgin territory of the West all the way to China and back again One hundred and sixty years later, Tina Plank, an unhappy teenager, meets Trixie, a girl with a troWhen Cookie Figowitz, the cook for a party of volatile fur trappers trekking through the Oregon Territory in the 1820s, joins up with the refugee Henry Brown, the two begin a wild ride that takes them from the virgin territory of the West all the way to China and back again One hundred and sixty years later, Tina Plank, an unhappy teenager, meets Trixie, a girl with a troubled past, and the two become fast friends But when two skeletons are accidentally unearthed from their common ground, the lives of Tina and Trixie, Cookie and Henry are brought together in unexpected and startling ways.

    One thought on “The Half-Life: A Novel”

    1. I just couldn't put this down. I wanted closure! The author takes you on two long and winding journeys, each in its own century. Although you think you know what will happen at the end, you really don't know. Exquisite, almost agonzing descriptions of every little detail throughout, but the language illuminates the story so well.

    2. I find it very puzzling when a writer who has something to say and possesses an honest and lyrical talent for saying it does not catch the readers' attention so that he will carry on and do more work like this present title gives us.Two stories running side by side: an 1820s tale of fur trappers and traders in the Hudson's Bay Company purview between the Columbia and the Willamette Rivers in Oregon. It is just before the onrush of settlers and the land is wide open, peopled by Natives and by the [...]

    3. Whenever I'm not quite sure how to rate a book, I usually round up. This book gets an extra star because I like the depiction of unique relationships. "If I could attach my flesh to your own so we could become each other, I would . . . It took a long time for me to recognize you for who you were . . . To understand that you were in fact a part of me . . . All these moments will be lost like tears in the rain." It's very sweet. However, just because the book doesn't discuss sex and just because i [...]

    4. baroque, even roccoco writing and a bit dispassionate first novel of westering trappers in early 1800s? nw usa, and in same location with two young modern women being outsider artists in the pacific northwest, and how the two stories parallel and intertwine. great ides. one has to ask themselves, would knopf have done this? would they have done it better than bloomsbury?

    5. This is definitely a first book. A lot of ideas and passion, but is lacking in conflict - some heat to make this potion simmer.

    6. I slogged through this, forgetting how much better a book could be until I started the next one. There are two parallel stories, both set in the same landscape near Portland, Oregon, one during the frontier period in the mid-nineteenth century, the other on a commnity of aging hippies in the 1980s. The first, by far the more interesting story, relates the friendship between two men, one a cook for trapping expeditions. They cook up a scheme to get rich by selling vials of a glandular extract fro [...]

    7. Dear Author,Why do you think ELM TREES grow in Oregon's natural forest? Sure they grow in cities (because they were planted there), but not in Oregon forests. We're you thinking of a setting before the Dutch Elm Disease? Because that still doesn't work, as I said before Oregon forests don't have Elms growing, and they never have. Is this a subtle "Magical Realism"? Have you ever picked up a book about trees of North America and flipped to Elm trees, noting where they grow? Do you even know what [...]

    8. This novel consists of two stories, seemingly unrelated, but that intertwine around each other to create a rather unusual whole. One part takes place in the 1820s and the other in the 1970s in Oregon. At first, I thought there would be a more obvious connection between the two stories, but I came to realize that in the end, this novel is an exploration of how we define ourselves by others -- a startling and fascinating concept. Raymond isn't a particularly good writer (I felt like I was reading [...]

    9. One of my favorite books about Portland (Nicole George's INVINCIBLE SUMMER books being another). Really gives you that sense of where Portland's weirdness vibe actually originated, reinforcing the vague feeling that Portland is still a little outpost out in the woods. Jon Raymond is also just a flat out great writer, ala Franzen, etc.

    10. This book has two stories that are unfolding simoultaneously (where is spellcheck, again?) one now with two teenage girls as the main characters, the other a man named Cookie, and his journey out to Oregon, and than to distant shore. There stories somehow overlap, and really its wonderful, and suprising. LOCAL AUTHOR!

    11. Two stories taking place in Portland, OR are intertwined…one is the story of Cookie and Henry, trappers in the Oregon Territory in the 1800’s. The other is the story of Tina and Trixie, teenage girls living in a commune and trying to find meaning in life. Both stories focus on friendship.

    12. Beautifully written. This is an engaging, "epic" novel with Portland, OR as a primary backdrop - both in the 19th and 20th centuries. It was written by a high school classmate and I'm thrilled for him that he's found such a tremendous way to share his artistic gift.

    13. Beautiful book. Seb read it after me and couldn't stop resding this either. A lot of history of the Pacific Northwest & China - very interesting and lovely.

    14. Mediocre and predictable. And on a not important side note, I felt the author just randomly threw in Portland streets and signs for no apparent reason.

    15. jon raymond kicks all the ass! and delves into the poignant, muddy history and recent past of Oregon culture. lovely stuff.

    16. The writing style seemed to be reaching and the plot lacked. That being said, I couldn't put the dang thing down for three days.

    17. This book is meticulously historically researched. The telling of two events in the Oregon Territory, separated by over 170 years, reveals surprising human relationships. An excellent read!

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